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  • :<i>See also</i>: [[Electricity]] and [[Maxwell's equations]] ...ed by [[photon]]s, uncharged, energetic particles exchanged by interacting charges and currents.<ref name=photon/>
    21 KB (3,132 words) - 19:19, 30 August 2011
  • 81 B (10 words) - 22:27, 28 August 2010
  • ...al repulsion of like-charged particles and mutual attraction of oppositely charged particles.
    250 B (34 words) - 19:08, 22 August 2011
  • The potential of a physical system to provide or accept [[electron]]s.
    106 B (15 words) - 22:29, 28 August 2010
  • {{r|Electricity}} {{r|Gauss' law (electrostatics)}}
    961 B (150 words) - 16:36, 28 July 2011

Page text matches

  • {{rpl|Charge (science)}} {{rpl|Electric charge}}
    271 B (31 words) - 10:08, 26 September 2013
  • :<i>See also</i>: [[Electricity]] and [[Maxwell's equations]] ...ed by [[photon]]s, uncharged, energetic particles exchanged by interacting charges and currents.<ref name=photon/>
    21 KB (3,132 words) - 19:19, 30 August 2011
  • ...]]; the two time-dependent fields together form an [[electromagnetic wave|electromagnetic field]]. ...oulomb]], equivalent to [[volt]] per [[meter]]. In [[Gaussian units]], the electric field is expressed in units of [[dyne]] per [[statcoulomb]] (formerly kno
    6 KB (913 words) - 16:51, 13 January 2010
  • ...es-Augustin de Coulomb]]. It is an [[inverse-square law]] for two electric charges very similar to Newton's [[gravitation|gravitational law]] for two masses ...hat fills the space between the charges. All non-conducting materials ([[dielectric]]s) weaken the Coulomb force (have &epsilon;<sub>r</sub> > 1).
    12 KB (2,011 words) - 02:24, 26 August 2011
  • ...hat generates a flow of electrons, or between a point in a device and an [[electrical ground]]. ...tial difference. A '''volt''' equals one joule per coulomb. The units of electrical potential in the [[SI]] and most other systems of units are [[volt]]s.
    1 KB (210 words) - 21:58, 8 December 2007
  • ...tical theory that describes the [[weak force|weak]], [[Maxwell's equations|electromagnetic]] and [[Strong force|strong]] interactions between [[lepton]]s and ...ctric charge]] is the mechanism underlying the field's ability to exert an electromagnetic force upon these bodies.
    21 KB (3,037 words) - 20:00, 27 May 2014
  • ...ntization of the electromagnetic field|quanta]] of the [[Maxwell equations|electromagnetic field]].
    303 B (37 words) - 15:31, 12 October 2011
  • * [[Coulomb (unit)]] SI unit of electric charge * [[Coulomb's law]] Force between electric charges
    225 B (26 words) - 02:35, 24 September 2008
  • ...ctric dipole''' is a charge distribution consisting of two electric point charges of opposite sign and equal magnitude. ...neral one is interested in the electric potential field due to the dipolar charge distribution at a distance ''R'' from the midpoint of the dipole. If it
    8 KB (1,266 words) - 10:17, 31 August 2009
  • ...'', refers to the magnitude of the electrical charge both on an [[Electron|electron]] and on a [[Proton|proton]]. It was first measured by Robert Millikan i ...nty |url=http://physics.nist.gov/cgi-bin/cuu/Value?e|search_for=elementary+charge |publisher=[[National Institute of Standards and Technology]] |accessdate=
    3 KB (454 words) - 14:43, 30 March 2011
  • ...s a [[magnetic field]], and a time-varying electric current generates an [[electromagnetic wave]], as described by [[Maxwell's equations]]. The [[SI unit]] for electric current is the [[ampere]].
    711 B (103 words) - 13:37, 21 August 2011
  • {{r|Electromagnetism}} {{r|Electric charge}}
    781 B (105 words) - 14:49, 7 December 2008
  • ...charged balloon close to your hair, the balloon will attract your hair by electric [[force]]s. ...removed, then no current will run. Whenever we want to extract energy from electricity we need a closed loop.
    4 KB (661 words) - 19:58, 1 September 2011
  • A subatomic particle with an electric charge of +1 elementary charge.
    106 B (13 words) - 07:39, 30 April 2009
  • ...sometimes referred to as ''flavors'' of lepton:<ref name=Srednicki/> the [[electron]], [[muon]], [[tau]] and their associated [[neutrino]]s. The leptons are ==Electric charge==
    4 KB (549 words) - 18:35, 12 September 2011
  • ...lectron), between tiny charged droplets of oil suspended between two metal electrodes.
    196 B (26 words) - 08:58, 4 September 2009
  • ...[canonical commutation relations]], see the article [[quantization of the electromagnetic field]]. ...axwell was the first to see that his equations predict the existence of [[electromagnetic wave]]s. Without knowledge and understanding of these waves we wou
    18 KB (2,680 words) - 23:46, 16 December 2010
  • ...ease by which &rho; can be polarized under the influence of an external [[electric field]] '''E'''. ...itly assumed that &rho; is stable, there are internal forces that keep the charges together. These internal forces resist the polarization and determine the
    12 KB (1,839 words) - 15:43, 5 October 2009
  • ...ectromagnetic radiation]]. The [[electric current]] passing through the discharge channels rapidly heats and expands the air into [[Plasma (physics)|plasma] During early investigations into electricity via [[Leyden jar]]s and other instruments, a number of people ([[Willi
    47 KB (7,316 words) - 00:10, 18 October 2013
  • The flow or presence of electric charge; the flow of electricity is an important carrier of energy.
    135 B (20 words) - 11:19, 30 June 2008

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