User:Stephen Ewen/MP

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Draft of the Week [ about ]

Roger Federer, today's best player, hitting a forehand against James Blake in the quarterfinals of the 2006 U.S. Open.

Tennis is a sport played between either two players ("singles") or two teams of two players ("doubles"). Players use a stringed racquet to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponent's court. In some places tennis is still called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that originated in France in the Middle Ages and is played indoors on a very different court. Originating in England in the late 19th century... [more...]

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(CC) Photo: Alton Thompson

A symphony is a large-scale musical composition for an orchestra. Since the late eighteenth century, composers have regarded the symphony as “the central form of orchestral composition”, similar to how writers of fiction regard the novel, and filmmakers the feature film. According to music historian Michael Kennedy, the symphony “is reserved by composers for their most weighty and profound orchestral thoughts, but of course there are many light-hearted, witty, and entertaining symphonies.” [more...]

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Section of the Great Wall of China

(CC) Photo: Eugene Wei
Section of the Great Wall of China.
(CC) Photo: Eugene Wei