Towr Kham

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Towr Kham is a border crossing town from Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, to Pakistan. is a city on the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan in the Khyber Pass. It is also called Torkham or Turkham.

Border area including Towr Kham

Highway 1 connects Towr Kham to Kabul via the Ring Road; it also goes to the Towr Kham border crossing with Pakistan. [1] The Pakistani side of the border is in the Khyber Agency of the Federally Administered Tribal Area.

Security issues

In November 2001 the New York Times reported that Towr Kham was the home of Hazrati Ali, an anti-Taliban militia leader who seized power after the Taliban retreated. He had joined forces with two other militia leaders, Mawlawi Yunis Khalis, and Ezatullah, to set up a regional provisional government.[2]

American forces staff the nearby Towr Kham Fire Base.[3] In April 2006 the Afghan Border Police announced that they would start requiring travelers crossing the border at Towr Kham to possess valid travel documents.[4]

References

  1. Lt. Col Gordon Phillips and State Department Representative Shawn Waddoups. DoD News Briefing with Lt. Col. Phillips from Afghanistan, United States Department of Defense, August 22, 2007. Retrieved on 2008-02-10.
  2. David Rohde. A NATION CHALLENGED: AFGHANISTAN REDUX; Warlord Rule Is Re-emerging In Some Towns, New York Times, Friday, November 16, 2001. Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  3. Sgt. Matt Summers. 'Fighting Deuce' MPs Patrol Afghan Mountains, Defend America, May 26, 2006. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.
  4. Afghan Police Secure Towr Kham Border, American Forces Press Service, April 10 2006. Retrieved on 2008-02-18.