Talk:Stress and appetite

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  1. Christina Lang 13:17, 28 September 2010 (UTC)
  2. Cyrus Dailami 12:42, 28 September 2010 (UTC)
  3. James Pattinson 13:08, 28 September 2010 (UTC)
  4. Emelie Gustafson 13:16, 28 September 2010 (UTC)
  5. Holly Clark 13:17, 28 September 2010 (UTC)
  6. Gillian McNeill 13:17, 28 September 2010 (UTC)
  7. Thomas C Horne 13:23, 28 September 2010 (UTC)

Testing! We are far too many on this topic. Max. 4. During the class last week it was decided that Holly, Gillian, Christina and I (Emelie) were doing this topic since we signed up to it. Just wondering what's going on, and how we are going to adress this.

I think the course organiser agreed that more than one group could carry out the same talk, is there any way we could split the talk? or maybe he wouldn't mind if two groups covered the same talk.

The problem is that then the same topics will be covered. But if the course organise is okay with it, then I suppose it would be okay. But I doubt that there will be 7 different topics under this subject which will be big enough to write enough on. So they would end up pretty similar.Emelie Gustafson 13:36, 28 September 2010 (UTC)

This is potentially a very large topic; it will include peripheral actions of glucocorticoids, the role of the PVN as a target for appetite regulating circuits and as a controller of the HPA axis and the sympathetic nervous system, sympathetic regulation, "comfort" eating, effects of chronic severe stress (including cachexia), and should touch on POMC deficiency and clinical conditions (Cushings etc).
Stress has a bidirectional effect on appetite; mild intermittent stress generally stimulates appetite but chronic severe stress can lead to loss of appetite and severe weight loss. One natural separation might be to look separately at the mechanisms by which stress can lead to weight gain and mechanisms by which stress can lead to weight loss. One subtopic might be the actions of glucocorticoids and another the neural circuitry of interactions between the PVN and appetite regulating centres. Gareth Leng 09:50, 1 October 2010 (UTC)

Cyrus, you are registered both in Genetics of Obesity, and Stress and Appetite, please choose only one of these topics. Thanks. Nancy Sabatier 09:54, 1 October 2010 (UTC)

How are we feeling about the separation of the topic? In light of some research I think ti might be easier to keep it as on topic but with 7 subheadings, as to avoid significant overlap. Opinions? I have thought of some rough subheading suggestions, none of which are necessarily great, but I would love some input.

- Neural mechanisms of stress, neural mechanisms of appetite--> How they are interconnected.

-Chronic stress (habitual stress?), decrease in appetite?--Illness (Cushings?), wasitng (cancer?)--Weight gain in the long term? Abdominal fat and resulting morbidity?

- Acute stress (Novel stressors?)--Increase in appetite? Specific appetite for food high in calories?

- Psychology behind the link between stress and eating--Habit formation, learning and memory as induced by GCs

- Physiology behind increased calorie consumption and stress--how increases in available fat decreases the activity of the HPA axis?

- Comfort eating--male and female differences? Why there are differences? Consequences of comfprt eating and how it links to the above topics.

These are just rough suggestions. We could then each have a sub-heading and communicate through here what we intend on writing, thus avoiding overlap. Please let me know what you guys think.Emelie Gustafson 11:12, 4 October 2010 (UTC)


Emelie, I think that splitting the topic into seven subtopics is the best idea! We could each concentrate on a specific aspect, and then come together to edit them and write a short conclusion.

I agree with the subheadings you have suggested, although I think we could also include a general introduction to the stress response and the HPA axis, as having a general understanding of these topics would be most helpful to any non-scientific readers.

Also, in the comfort eating section, I think it would be helpful to talk about why people comfort eat, ie, that high sugar/fat foods play a part in inhibiting the stress response and promoting a feeling of well-being (and the link to serotonin production. The following article is a good starting point for this topic; http://www.pnas.org/content/100/20/11696.full Holly Clark

Holly, that sounds great. Would you mind making an updated list of subheadings? If no one has any objections in the next couple of days I would suggest that we indicate which subheading we want and start our research so that we can publish our references by next week, if Im not mistaken the deadline for that is the 12th?Emelie Gustafson 10:53, 7 October 2010 (UTC)

Since I haven't heard anything from anyone with any objections, I am just going to go ahead and say that I would like to write about the neural mechanisms of appetite and if there are enough topics for everyone, I think that I could use the introduction to the neural mechanisms of appetite as well as the stress axis as an introduction to the paper. Then you guys can expand on how the two are interconnected in the following parts of this paper. Any comments? So basically, I will write the introduction, including a brief description of the neural mechanisms underlying appetite and stress. If everyone could indicate what they will be writing about, we should be able to get started soon. Cheers.Emelie Gustafson 15:27, 10 October 2010 (UTC)


Related articles

You'll see that on the Related articles subpage I've placed links to all the articles from the other groups this year - and also to last year's articles. Good luck with this, I'm seeing some reference lists come up, but not all.Gareth Leng 16:03, 9 October 2010 (UTC)


Hey guys, so here's an updated version of Emelie's subheadings. If we could start posting possible papers on here, since we need to get a Bibliography together by Tuesday!!

- General intro to the stress response and the HPA axis (HOLLY)

- Neural mechanisms of appetite and how this interconnects with the HPA axis (EMELIE)

-Chronic stress (habitual stress?), decrease in appetite?--Illness (Cushings?), wasitng (cancer?)--Weight gain in the long term? Management of weight and stress? Abdominal fat and resulting morbidity?

- Acute stress (Novel stressors?)--Increase in appetite? Specific appetite for food high in calories? (CHRISTIE)

- Psychology behind the link between stress and eating--Habit formation, learning and memory as induced by GCs (GILLIAN)

- Physiology behind increased calorie consumption and stress--how increases in available fat decreases the activity of the HPA axis?

- Comfort eating--male and female differences? Why there are differences? Consequences of comfprt eating and how it links to the above topics. ALSO people comfort eat, ie, that high sugar/fat foods play a part in inhibiting the stress response and promoting a feeling of well-being (and the link to serotonin production. The following article is a good starting point for this topic; http://www.pnas.org/content/100/20/11696.full

Holly Clark 18.00 10/10/10


Excellent Holly, I will pick and write about the second of the topics: Neural mechanisms of appetite and how this interconnects with the HPA axis, if that's ok. If everyone could post their name next to the subheadings that would be great!Emelie Gustafson 09:55, 11 October 2010 (UTC)


Hello, I will do the psychology behind the link between stress and eating if that is ok. Gillian McNeill 09:58, 11 October 2010 (UTC)

It seems that Emelie and Holly have been doing most of the thinking so far. It's a big subject, they're going to need inputs from all of you guys. Nancy Sabatier 11:37, 11 October 2010 (UTC)


Alright guys, I have added my references to the bibliography page. They are quite good journals, and may be relevant for other topics. I limited the number since we are so many, I think that around 3 references each should be sufficient. Also, if anyone prefers a different way of referencing please say so, since we all need to do it the same way, and I will amend mine. Emelie Gustafson 13:08, 11 October 2010 (UTC)

Hiya, sorry about the delay i'll do the Acute Stress topic :) Christina Lang 09:24, 12 October 2010 (UTC)

Just another thought, do you think we should have a small section on managing weight and stress? Or should this be included in the chronic stress section? Christina Lang 09:53, 12 October 2010 (UTC)

I'll do the general intro to stress and the HPA axis. Christie, I think that would be a good section to include! It could probably be incorporated into the chronic stress section, so I'll amend that under the subheading :) Holly Clark 11.51, 12/10/10


Cyrus, James, and Thomas, it would be great to hear from you and see your contribution to the article. Nancy Sabatier 13:25, 18 October 2010 (UTC)

Hi, how long are we thinking that each of our sections should be? And also is anybody good with computers who could do the diagrams, or are we all just going to draw our own if we want any? Christina Lang 13:27, 18 October 2010 (UTC)

I think that since we are so many, a couple of paragraphs will be sufficient. Like 500 words? I am horrible at computers and just tend to use paint, which usually works fine. Shall we just make our own diagrams and include them in our section? Emelie Gustafson 20:13, 18 October 2010 (UTC)

Hi Guys, sorry we haven't written on this to update you. I didn't actually realise this talk page existed. I think the distribution of topics looks reasonable. We've got some info on the HPA axis and how that links in. Ditto with the other sections as we didn't realise exactly of how we were dividing it up. Anyway, here is what we are working on:

Chronic Stress - Tom

Physiology behind calorie consumption - Cyrus

Comfort eating - Jamie P

Shall we set a rough date when we should come up with a first draft? Thomas C Horne


Hey Tom, according to the home page we're meant to have a rough draft (intro plus detailed plan of subheadings & diagrams) by Tuesday 26th Oct.

Emelie, I think ~500 words is a good length! And if we each just stick to doing diagrams for our own sections, I too am dire with computers, I may even hand-draw my diagrams and scan them in! Holly Clark12:01 21/10/10

Hey guys, I have added something to the main page, mostly just to see what it is like. The main body of the text is really rough, but the first and second paragraph are complete, which can give the topics surrounding mine and idea of what I have said. I have tried to insert a diagram which I have drawn myself, but so far no luck. Shall see if I ever figure it out.. Emelie Gustafson 17:15, 24 October 2010 (UTC)

Okay so I think I am done with my section. I know it was only supposed to be a rough draft, but I have huge deadlines coming up in other courses so I wanted this one done. Please let me know what you guys think. It turns out the topic I chose was HUGE and it struggled a bit to narrow it down and only write about the essentials, I swear it could have been a whole project on its own! I am still trying to upload my awsome (haha) diagram, so it may not appear with the text. What I am hoping is that there is enough in my section to build on for the following sections...Emelie Gustafson 19:42, 24 October 2010 (UTC)

Oh crap, so I managed to get my picture up, but the formating is all wrong. Anyone good at this sort of stuff? Its driving me crazy so I am going to leave it for now. The text is done, and the diagram is as well, just not very well visible...Emelie Gustafson 20:03, 24 October 2010 (UTC)

Have uploaded a little bit on the acute section - it won't be completed by tuesday as I have presentations to do this week for other electives, but it has my outline and I have all my information ready to go, just haven't written it out yet, but will get it in after my last presentation on Thursday. Hope thats ok. And sorry Emelie i'm also rubbish with formatting, the Wiki thing really stressed me out last year - maybe one of the boys will be better? Christina Lang 21:19, 24 October 2010 (UTC)

Hey guys, just wondering if anyone can help me...I made my diagram on word, not realising that Citizendium doesn't accept this file type. Do any of you know anyway I could convert it to an accepted file type? Or will I need to do it over again? Holly Clark 10:22 28/10/10

A warm welcome to you all

I hope you'll forgive the intrusion, but I wanted to say hello to you all.

I am looking forward to seeing your work on this very important and topical subject.

You're very welcome here and I wish you the best of luck with your studies.

Butting out, now.

Aleta Curry 21:48, 24 October 2010 (UTC) CZ Editorial Council member


Hey guys, I'm really sorry, I'm running a bit behind on this! I am planning to have my finished article up by the end of the week, hope that's alright. Holly Clark 21:07 25/10/10

Details

"It has been demonstrated that NPY neurons are abundant here, and that they are in close proximity to CRF cell bodies"

OK, be very careful; it's attention to these details that will make all the difference here and in the exams.

That statement is wrong. The PVN receives a projection from NPY cells of the arcuate nucleus - it doesn't contain NPY neurons (not in any relevant way). HOWEVER, the PVN also receives a projection from NPY cells of the caudal brainstem.

So:

There are immunoreactive NPY terminals close to CRF cells. (Example of accurate detail, evidence of some knowledge in depth, minimum that we expect at this level) Do these come from the arcuate nucleus? (Answer that, and explain what the evidence is, and that's evidence of significant knowledge in depth and of understanding the experimental basis of our knowledge - and that's the kind of level we're looking for at 1st class level)

I'm not picking on you here, I know it's a draft, but thought it was a good opportunity to show you the level you have to reach for.Gareth Leng 15:14, 25 October 2010 (UTC)

Diagram

Emelie, your diagram looks fine except for the font which is not readable, I suspect it's just a problem of font size, try to increase it. I have included your legend at the bottom of the diagram rather than having it in the main text. To do this, you just have to type in your legend in the diagram wiki in place of Image Caption. Look at the edited text and you'll understand. Nancy Sabatier 13:03, 26 October 2010 (UTC)


Okay, I have had a read through my references again, and I realise that what I had written was unclear, so it has been changed. I also did some furhter research, and found a good paper showing that the NPY innervation to the PVN is indeed from the ARC. So I have added that too. As for the diagram, thank you Nancy for the help. I will attempt to change the font on my original diagram and upload it again, but this might take a bit of tinkering, will try to have it fixed tomorrow. Emelie Gustafson 15:48, 26 October 2010 (UTC)

Emelie, your section reads nicely still contains some misconceptions: the statement about NPY neurons in the PVN is still there and be careful about what peptides POMC neurons actually release. How are everyone else's section coming on? Get them posted and determine how to link the topics together! John Menzies 16:12, 26 October 2010 (UTC)


Hey guys, just wondering if anyone can help me...I made my diagram on word, not realising that Citizendium doesn't accept this file type. Do any of you know anyway I could convert it to an accepted file type? Or will I need to do it over again? Holly Clark 10:22 28/10/10

Holly, have you tried copying or inserting your diagram from Word into PowerPoint? It might get distorted but it's worth trying. I have tidied up your article, for some reason what you had written appeared twice. Nancy Sabatier 11:25, 29 October 2010 (UTC)


I've added my section, I need to reference it now. Thomas Horne 18:40, 9 November 2010 (UTC)

Ok, I think I'm finished. Is it alright? I could put in more evidence in the last paragraph about neuronal death and hippocampus degeneration as a result of chronic stress, but I thought that would overlap too much with the chronic stress section. What do you think? Holly Clark 11/11/10 12:57

Looks good guys, I like your diagram Holly. I still haven't managed to change the font of my figure. Seems impossible to edit a paint image once it has been saved...Emelie Gustafson 09:12, 12 November 2010 (UTC)

Just referencing my part just now - also not sure how to move my diagram, its currently in the chronic stress section?? Where are the last two sections? Are we needing to do any other editing to the page? Christina Lang 19:56, 16 November 2010 (UTC)

Editing

"CRF inhibits NPY neurones" - what exactly is the evidence for this?

"Leptin ...can directly inhibit glucocorticoid secretion" directly??

Gareth Leng 16:35, 25 November 2010 (UTC)