Talk:Ray Casey

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 Definition Was a prominent West Coast tennis player of the 1920s and 1930s whose greatest moment of glory was nearly winning the Wimbledon doubles title in 1925. [d] [e]
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NOTICE, please do not remove from top of page.
I wrote 100% of this article at Wikipedia. It is unchanged here except for very minor editing. Hayford Peirce 19:31, 25 May 2007 (CDT)

I have subsequently added extensive new material so that this notice could probably be removed. Hayford Peirce 18:47, 30 May 2008 (CDT)

Check the history of edits to see who inserted this notice.

The history of the image in the article

When I first created this article around the end of May, 2007, I included the cartoon from The Daily Mail. Stephen Ewen and I discussed whether it could be included under a Fair Use doctrine. He also advised me to contact The Daily Mail with an explanation of the cartoon and a request for permission to use it. I emailed The Daily Mail but never received a response. I believe that Stephen also emailed them, but once again without a response. The Mail's website, which we both used, did not, for some reason, allow a copy of the email to be made, so no record of those emails exists.

I have now decided to reinstall this image. I will email the Daily Mail again, this time making a copy of the text of my email before inserting it into their Website. I will then add this text to the justification that accompanies the image here at CZ. I think that this will be sufficient to show that we have made a good faith attempt to receive permission to use this cartoon.

  • Here is what I originally wrote on Stephen's discussion page (it is now in his Archive 5 at [1]): "Hi, Stephen. Could you take a look at Ray Casey and see what you think. I remember that when I wrote this article for Wikipedia and put in the picture almost 3 years ago I spent a long time trying to read up on the British copyright system. I also ran my findings past at least two Wiki administrators who seemed to think that my use of the image was permitted. In any case, it hasn't yet been deleted from Wiki and it's sure been there a long time by their standards. If you don't think it's permitted, however, please delete it instantly and I apologize in advance for bothering you with it. Hayford Peirce 21:25, 25 May 2007 (CDT)" Hayford Peirce 19:00, 30 May 2008 (CDT)

new email to the Daily Mail

Here is the text of the email that I just sent:

  • I am a contributor to the Citizendium (http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/Main_Page), a new and improved version of Wikipedia. For an article about an old-time tennis player that I first wrote in Wikipedia several years ago, and then rewrote for the Citizendium (http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/Ray_Casey), I used an image of a cartoon that originally ran in your newspaper in the sports section of the issue of Tuesday, June 25, 1925. Ray Casey, the tennis player in question, had cut out and framed your cartoon. I took a photograph of this framed cartoon around 1980 at his home and subsequently scanned it and turned it into a .JPG file, which is what I have used in both the Wikipedia article and the Citizendium article. It is my understanding from an examination of British copyright law that this cartoon long ago passed into the public domain and that I am free to use it. Nevertheless, I am contacting you in order to ask your permission in the extremely unlikely case that your paper still retains title to its copyright. Since this is a very poor reproduction of the original cartoon, I believe that in any case it falls into a "fair use" category in order to illustrate this encyclopedia article. Please note that, like Wikipedia, the Citizendium is a non-profit organization devoted to disseminating knowledge throughtout the world. I would greatly appreciate receiving your permission to use this cartoon -- your paper will, of course, be credited for its use.
  • Thank you in advance,
  • Hayford Peirce
Hayford Peirce 19:30, 30 May 2008 (CDT)