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Steven Bellovin

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Steve Bellovin is a computer security expert who was at Bell Labs for many years and is currently (2010) at Columbia University. He has been quite active in the IETF. He was a member of the Internet Architecture Board 1996-2002, and IETF Security Area co-director, and hence a member of the Internet Engineering Steering Group (IESG), 2002-2004.

He has a home page at Columbia. "I do research on networks, security and why the two don't get along." Bellovin was a participant on the Cypherpunk mailing list and on its successor, Perry Metzger's cryptography list.

While a graduate student, Bellovin was one of the people who created Usenet. He and two others — Tom Truscott and Jim Ellis — received the Usenix associations Flame award for this in 1995.

With William Cheswick, he introduced the concept of the firewall. [1] [2]

He has written on issues in the technical control of nuclear weapons, especially Permissive Action Links.[3]

References

  1. Steve Bellovin and William Cheswick (1994), Firewalls and Internet Security, Addison-Wesley
  2. William R. Cheswick, Steven M. Bellovin, and Aviel D. Rubin (2003), Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker, Second Edition, Addison-Wesley
  3. Steven Bellovin (21 October 2005), Permissive Action Links, Nuclear Weapons, and the History of Public Key Cryptography, Department of Computer Science, Columbia University