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State/Related Articles

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StatePlease do not use this term in your topic list, because there is no single article for it. Please substitute a more precise term. See State (disambiguation) for a list of available, more precise, topics. Please add a new usage if needed.

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  • Africa [r]: Continent stretching over the equator, hosting deserts, tropical jungles and savannah as well as over fifty nations; population about 900,000,000. [e]
  • Ancient Greece [r]: The loose collection of Greek-speaking city-states centered on the Aegean Sea which flourished from the end of the Mycenaean age to the Roman conquest of Greece in 146 BC. [e]
  • Aristocracy [r]: A form of government in which power is held by a select group of people. [e]
  • Australia [r]: Continent in the Southern Hemisphere and the federal parliamentary nation that occupies it. [e]
  • Benito Mussolini [r]: (1883-1945) The Fascist dictator of Italy from 1922 until 1943; as part of the Axis alliance, he led his country into war against France and Britain in 1940, and against the United States in 1941. [e]
  • Capital (city) [r]: Usually a major city, where the country's government is typically found. [e]
  • Civil society [r]: The space for social activity outside the market, state and household; the arena of uncoerced collective action around shared interests, purposes and values. [e]
  • Clandestine human-source intelligence [r]: clandestine operations by people who secretly collect intelligence, and their support by couriers, forgers, radio operators, and other operational personnel. [e]
  • Commercial state [r]: The concept, sometimes associated with Adam Ferguson's concept of civil society, which refers to a political state devoted primarily to the promotion and advancement of commercial interests. [e]
  • Condobolin, New South Wales [r]: A small town near the geographic centre of New South Wales. [e]
  • Country [r]: Nation, state, region, or territory, or large tract of land distinguishable by features of topography, biology, or culture. [e]
  • Democracy [r]: A form of government in which ultimate sovereignty rests with the people. [e]
  • Drought [r]: Lack or insufficiency of rain for an extended period that severely disturbs the hydrologic cycle in an area. [e]
  • English language [r]: A West Germanic language widely spoken in the United Kingdom, its territories and dependencies, Commonwealth countries and former colonial outposts of the British Empire; has developed the status of a global language. [e]
  • Foreign internal defense [r]: The United States military doctrine for assisting Host Nations in their counterinsurgency programs [e]
  • France [r]: Western European republic (population c. 64.1 million; capital Paris) extending across Europe from the English Channel in the north-west to the Mediterranean in the south-east; bounded by Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, Andorra and Spain; founding member of the European Union. Colonial power in Southeast Asia until 1954. [e]
  • Geographic Information System [r]: Combined database and mapping system for the capture, storage, and manipulation of geographic data. [e]
  • Global justice [r]: Topic in political philosophy arising from the concern that humans do not live in a just world. [e]
  • Interest group [r]: An organization that seeks to represent its members' interests, usually by seeking to influence political and/or public policy outcomes. [e]
  • Ireland (island) [r]: An island to the west coast of Great Britain, comprising the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. [e]
  • Italy [r]: Southern European republic (population c. 58.1 million; capital Rome) that has northern borders with France, Switzerland, Austria and Slovenia, and coastlines on the Tyrrhenian, Mediterranean, Ionian and Adriatic seas; founding member of the European Union. [e]
  • James Cook [r]: (1728-1779) a British explorer and navigator. [e]
  • John Locke [r]: (1632–1704) English empiricist philosopher. [e]
  • Journalism [r]: Practice of writing about daily events of interest to people - politics, international affairs, sports, etc. [e]
  • Koshi-byo (Nagasaki) [r]: A Confucius shrine in the south of Nagasaki, Japan; sovereign territory of the People's Republic of China. [e]
  • Language planning [r]: In sociolinguistics, the name for any political attempt to change the status of a language in some way or develop new ways of using it, e.g. a government devising laws to promote a language, or scholars producing an official dictionary; the former is status planning (changing the political recognition of a language), the latter corpus planning (changing the way a language is used). [e]
  • Latin America [r]: The region of the Americas that shares a common tradition and historical heritage of European colonization, mostly Iberian. [e]
  • Law [r]: Body of rules of conduct of binding legal force and effect, prescribed, recognized, and enforced by a controlling authority. [e]
  • Lazio [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Nation [r]: A large group of people with a singular, shared, and commonly-accepted historical identity, identified by a universally recognised name. [e]
  • New South Wales [r]: Most populous Australian state, whose capital city is Sydney. [e]
  • Niccolò Machiavelli [r]: (3 May 1469 – 21 June 1527) Italian philosopher and writer, considered one of the main founders of modern political science. [e]
  • Nonprofit Terminology [r]: Terms often used interchangeably to refer to organizations and services not bought and sold in markets or directly controlled by governments. Terms like nonprofit, not-for-profit and nongovernmental emphasize slightly different facets of phenomena occurring 'outside' markets and governments. [e]
  • Official language [r]: one given political recognition in a region, usually a state, and typically used in politics and law. [e]
  • Parliament of the United Kingdom [r]: The supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom its territories. [e]
  • Political system [r]: Recursive structures for transforming existing values into political demands and supports which provoke authoritative decisions allocating values and lead to consequences which, in turn, provoke new patterns of demands and supports. [e]
  • Province [r]: Territorial unit, almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. [e]
  • Pseudostate [r]: A term put forward by the author and journalist Adam Hochschild to refer to political states or regions where power rests with a government or organisation either outside the country or in some way unaccountable - for example, a local militia. [e]
  • Public [r]: Shared by, open or available to everyone, well or generally known, universally available or without limit, done or made on behalf of the community as a whole, open to general or unlimited viewing or disclosure, frequented by large numbers of people or for general use, or places generally open or visible to all pertaining to official matters or maintained at taxpayer expense. [e]
  • Roman Senate [r]: The main deliberative body of the Roman Republic (founded in 509 B.C.), and its successor, the Roman Empire. [e]
  • Russia [r]: A country in northern Eurasia, with an area of 17 million km², currently the largest on our planet. [e]
  • School [r]: Please do not use this term in your topic list, because there is no single article for it. Please substitute a more precise term. See School (disambiguation) for a list of available, more precise, topics. Please add a new usage if needed.
  • Spanish language [r]: A Romance language widely spoken in Spain, its current and former territories, and the United States of America. [e]
  • Taiwan [r]: Formerly known as Formosa, an East Asian island and the common name for territories administered by the Republic of China. [e]
  • Theory of divine origin of the state [r]: Political and religious doctrine which asserts that the state is established by God, who rules the state directly or indirectly through someone regarded as an agent. [e]
  • Theory of divine right of kings [r]: Political and religious doctrine of royal absolutism, which asserts that a monarch is subject to no earthly authority, deriving his right to rule directly from the will of God. [e]
  • Trinity United Church of Christ, Chicago [r]: A predominantly black church located in south Chicago with upwards of 10,000 members, established in 1961. [e]
  • United Nations [r]: An international organization that was founded in 1945 with the mission of preventing international war, protecting human rights, supporting social progress and justice, and helping with economic progress. [e]
  • War [r]: A state of violent conflict which exists between two or more independent groups, each seeking to impose its will on the other. [e]
  • William Ewart Gladstone [r]: (1809-1898) The great Liberal prime minister of Britain's 19th century golden age of parliamentary government. [e]