Philosophy of Spinoza/Catalogs

From Citizendium, the Citizens' Compendium
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is developing and not approved.
Main Article
Talk
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
Catalogs [?]
 
An informational catalog, or several catalogs, about Philosophy of Spinoza.
  • Desire is the actual essence of man, in so far as it is conceived, as determined to a particular activity by some given modification of itself.[1]
  • Pleasure is the transition of a man from a less to a greater perfection.
  • Pain is the transition of a man from a greater to a less perfection.
  • Wonder is the conception (imaginatio) of anything, wherein the mind comes to a stand, because the particular concept in question has no connection with other concepts.
  • Contempt is "the conception of anything which touches the mind so little, that its presence leads the mind to imagine those qualities which are not in it rather than such as are in it."
  • Love is pleasure, accompanied by the idea of an external cause.
  • Lust is desire and love in the matter of sexual intercourse.
Painting of a nude woman looking into a mirror, with a naked child with wings (Cupid) holding the mirror.
Love, according to Spinoza, was pleasure tied with the idea of a person or thing as the cause of that pleasure; in contrast, lust is a desire to have sexual intercourse.
  • Hatred is pain, accompanied by the idea of an external cause.
  • Inclination is pleasure, accompanied by the idea of something which is accidentally a cause of pleasure.
  • Aversion is pain, accompanied by the idea of something which is accidentally the cause of pain.
  • Devotion is love towards one whom we admire.
  • Derision is pleasure arising from our conceiving the presence of a quality, which we despise, in an object which we hate.
  • Hope is an inconstant pleasure, arising from the idea of something past or future, whereof we to a certain extent doubt the issue.
  • Fear is an inconstant pain arising from the idea, of something past or future, whereof we to a certain extent doubt the issue.
  • Confidence is pleasure arising from the idea of something past or future, wherefrom all cause of doubt has been removed.
  • Despair is pain arising from the idea of something past or future, wherefrom all cause of doubt has been removed.
  • Joy is pleasure accompanied by the idea of something past, which has had an issue beyond our hope.
  • Disappointment is pain accompanied by the idea of something past, which has had an issue contrary to our hope.
  • Pity is pain accompanied by the idea of evil, which has befallen someone else whom we conceive to be like ourselves.
  • Approval is love towards one who has done good to another.
  • Indignation is hatred towards one who has done evil to another.
  • Partiality is thinking too highly of anyone because of the love we bear him.
  • Disparagement is thinking too meanly of anyone, because we hate him.
  • Envy is hatred, in so far as it induces a man to be pained by another's good fortune, and to rejoice in another's evil fortune.
  • Sympathy (misericordia) is love, in so far as it induces a man to feel pleasure at another's good fortune, and pain at another's evil fortune.
  • Self-approval is pleasure arising from a man's contemplation of himself and his own power of action.
  • Humility is pain arising from a man's contemplation of his own weakness of body or mind.
  • Repentance is pain accompanied by the idea of some action, which we believe we have performed by the free decision of our mind.
  • Pride is thinking too highly of one's self from self-love.
  • Self-abasement is thinking too meanly of one's self by reason of pain.
  • Honour (gloria) is pleasure accompanied by the idea of some action of our own, which we believe to be praised by others.
  • Shame is pain accompanied by the idea of some action of our own, which we believe to be blamed by others.
  • Regret is the desire or appetite to possess something, kept alive by the remembrance of the said thing, and at the same time constrained by the remembrance of other things which exclude the existence of it.
  • Emulation is the desire of something, engendered in us by our conception that others have the same desire.
  • Thankfulness or Gratitude is the desire or zeal springing from love, whereby we endeavour to benefit him, who with similar feelings of love has conferred a benefit on us.
  • Benevolence is the desire of benefiting one whom we pity.
  • Anger is the desire, whereby through hatred we are induced to injure one whom we hate.
  • Revenge is the desire whereby we are induced, through mutual hatred, to injure one who, with similar feelings, has injured us.
  • Cruelty or savageness is the desire, whereby a man is impelled to injure one whom we love or pity.
  • Timidity is the desire to avoid a greater evil, which we dread, by undergoing a lesser evil.
  • Daring is the desire, whereby a man is set on to do something dangerous which his equals fear to attempt.
  • Cowardice is attributed to one, whose desire is checked by the fear of some danger which his equals dare to encounter.
  • Consternation is attributed to one, whose desire of avoiding evil is checked by amazement at the evil which he fears.
  • Courtesy or deference (Humanitas seu modestia), is the desire of acting in a way that should please men, and refraining from that which should displease them.
  • Ambition is the immoderate desire of power.
  • Luxury is excessive desire, or even love of living sumptuously.
  • Intemperance is the excessive desire and love of drinking.
  • Avarice is the excessive desire and love of riches.

References

  1. R.H.M. Elwes (translator) 1883. Ethics, by Benedict de Spinoza; DEFINITIONS OF THE EMOTIONS., 'MTSU Philosophy WebWorks', 1883. Retrieved on 2009-12-08.