Naval warfare/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Naval warfare.
See also changes related to Naval warfare, or pages that link to Naval warfare or to this page or whose text contains "Naval warfare".

Parent topics

  • War [r]: A state of violent conflict which exists between two or more independent groups, each seeking to impose its will on the other. [e]
  • Navy [r]: A military force organized primarily for missions on, under, or above bodies of water [e]

Subtopics

  • Anti-air warfare [r]: In the context of naval warfare, the mission of defending against aircraft and missiles, from platforms under naval command and control, possibly in coordination with other services and possibly defending land as well as sea areas. [e]
  • Anti-aircraft artillery [r]: A general term for guns that can elevate to high angles and shoot accurately at aircraft, using visual, electro-optical, or radar guidance. [e]
  • Anti-satellite missile [r]: A weapon, launched from inside the atmosphere, intended to destroy an orbiting satellite. [e]
  • Anti-submarine warfare [r]: (ASW) In the context of naval warfare, the mission of attacking underwater vessels, from platforms under naval command and control. [e]
  • Anti-surface warfare [r]: (ASuW) In the context of naval warfare, the mission of attacking surface vessels, from small boats to supertankers and aircraft carriers, from platforms under naval command and control [e]
  • Amphibious warfare [r]: The set of techniques, equipment, specialized units, and methods of training needed to move troops across water, and deliver them to land, ready for immediate combat. [e]
  • Ballistic missile defense [r]: A combination of sensors, command and control systems, and missile/warhead kill mechanisms that protect a region, or, in the case of the U.S., theaters of operations as well as the nation proper. [e]
  • Combat search and rescue [r]: The location and rescue of military and civilian personnel in hostile areas, such that a military operation is necessary to retrieve them [e]
  • Commerce raiding [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Convoy [r]: A group of land or sea vehicles, grouped together for mutual support and protection; often consists of a core of unarmed units and an escort of combat vehicles [e]
  • Intelligence collection management [r]: Assigning questions to various collection techniques, reflecting the techniques available and the priority of the information need. Includes the process of categorizing information learned for subsequent analysis, and assigning probabilities of accuracy to the raw information [e]
  • Land attack [r]: A range of technologies and techniques used to attack targets on land from the sea; the targets are usually assumed to be well inland, and the weapons to be non-nuclear [e]
  • Letter of marque [r]: A government authorization which allows a private ship to act as a ship of war in naval engagements with the ships of another nation. [e]
  • Mine warfare [r]: An area of military technology and doctrine, which deals with the development, use of, defense against, and removal of land mines, improvised explosive devices, and sea mines. These devices are characterized by being distributed prior to the presence of an adversary; the mines trigger either by sensing the enemy, or by command from friendly forces. [e]
  • Naval gunfire support [r]: naval gun, unguided rocket, and guided missile fire from ships, in direct support of ground forces; does not include close air support even if the aircraft fly from ships [e]
  • Piracy [r]: Violence against, or detention of, by private individuals, against aircraft or ships under national registry [e]
  • Privateering [r]: A Government authorized form of piracy. [e]
  • Underway replenishment [r]: A series of techniques, introduced in the Second World War, for keeping warships in constant operation by resupplying them at sea; challenging both in the pure seamanship of the transfer, and the logistical system that brings supplies to the ships [e]
  • Vertical replenishment [r]: A subset of underway replenishment, in which the supply ship and the warship being resupplied do not physically connect, but use helicopters to transfer the supples. Faster and requiring less shiphandling skill than connected replenishment, but cannot transfer as large a volume [e]

Other related topics