Henry James

From Citizendium, the Citizens' Compendium
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is developing and not approved.
Main Article
Talk
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and not meant to be cited; by editing it you can help to improve it towards a future approved, citable version. These unapproved articles are subject to a disclaimer.

Henry James (New York, April 15, 1843 - London, February 28, 1916) was an American-born writer who in 1915 by naturalization became an English citizen. He was the younger brother of the pragmatist philosopher William James and is now regarded as one of the key figures of 19th-century literary realism.

He was a master and innovator of prose fiction. In works as Daisy Miller (1879), The Portrait of a Lady (1881), The Bostonians (1886), and The Ambassadors (1903) he contrasted the wisdom and innocence of the New World with the corruption and wisdom of the Old.

Among his other noteworthy works are the following: Watch and Ward (1871); Roderick Hudson (1875); French Poets and Novelists (1878); A Life of Hawthorne (1879); Portraits of Places (1884); Partial Portraits (1888); The Tragic Muse (1890); Essays in London (1893); The Two Magics (1898); The Awkward Age (1898); The Wings of the Dove (1902); The Golden Bowl (1904); English Hours (1905); The American Scene (1907); The High Bid (1909); Italian Hours (1909).