Fred Halliday

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Fred Halliday(1946-2-2010) was ICREA research professor at IBEI, the Barcelona Institute for International Studies. He was formerly professor of international relations at the London School of Economics. He commented on media including the BBC, ABC, al-Jazeera television, CBC and Irish radio.

Born in Ireland, he studied at Queen's College, Oxford University and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. He has been a fellow of the Transnational Institute and an editor of New Left Review.

Halliday writes that the West has not moved beyond Cold War thinking, [1] observing that Davos discussions do not properly address militant Islam and the rise of China. His review of Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order was scathing.

He saw the 9-11 Attack as reversing a trend toward "universalism" and world order.
On the militant Islamic side, the worldwide military challenge to US power is framed in particularist, religious, nationalist and historical language; it rejects any sense of global solidarity against oppression. On the western side, state policies have equally fallen back on particularist rhetoric and practice – whether in the appeals of the US president after 9/11 to "American values", the Russian invocation of a right to a worldwide attack on its enemies after the Chechen infanticide of September 2004, or the instinctive appeal to "European values" by European Union states in the aftermath of the 11 March 2004 bombings in Madrid. [2]

References

  1. Fred Halliday (30 January 2005), "It's time to bin the past", The Observer
  2. Fred Halliday, "The Crisis of Universalism: America and Radical Islam after 9/11", openDemocracy, Transnational Institute