Francophobia

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Francophobia, anti-Frenchism or anti-French sentiment is a hostility or distrust toward metropolitan French people and French culture.

Freedom Fries

In 2003, the French government, who said the inspectors in Iraq needed more time, refused to support USA's war against Iraq. Restaurant owners in the US then decided to change the name "French fries" on their menus to "freedom fries" to show their patriotism and their support to the American troops. This move against the term "French fries" was started by Bob Ney, a republican representative at the House of Representatives' cafeteria and was very much publicized.

Vive le Québec libre!

On July 24, 1967, then French President Charles de Gaulle was the cause of massive anti-French sentiment in Canada and the UK when he used the phrase, "Vive le Québec libre", during a speech he was giving in front of Montreal City Hall. Canadian Premier Lester B Pearson released an official statement claiming, "Canadians do not need to be liberated." De Gaulle cut short his visit and returned to France.

De Gaulle, and by association all French people, were particularly resented in Britain during that time due to De Gaulle's constant vetoing of the UK's application to join the European Economic Community (EEC), the forerunner of today's European Union.