NOTICE: Citizendium is still being set up on its newer server, treat as a beta for now; please see here for more.
Citizendium - a community developing a quality comprehensive compendium of knowledge, online and free. Click here to join and contribute—free
CZ thanks our previous donors. Donate here. Treasurer's Financial Report -- Thanks to our content contributors. --

Executive Order 12333

From Citizendium, the Citizens' Compendium
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is a stub and thus not approved.
Main Article
Talk
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and not meant to be cited; by editing it you can help to improve it towards a future approved, citable version. These unapproved articles are subject to a disclaimer.

Executive Order 12333 is an Executive Order signed into effect on December 4th, 1981, by United States President Ronald Reagan.[1][2] It extends the powers and responsibilities of agencies of the United States intelligence community and directs the leaders of other US federal agencies to co-operate fully with CIA requests for information.

One of the clauses of this executive order reiterated a proscription on US intelligence agencies carrying out, or sponsoring assassination.[3][4] During the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush administrations the proscription against assassination was reinterpreted, and relaxed, for targets who were classified as connected to terrorism..

References

  1. Ronald Reagan. Executive Order 12333--United States intelligence activities, US Federal Register, December 4, 1981. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  2. Should U.S. officials say anything that could harm U.S. soldiers?, Milnet. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  3. Walter Pincus. Saddam Hussein's Death Is a Goal, Says Ex-CIA Chief, Washington Post, February 15, 1998, p. A36. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  4. Barton Gellman. CIA Weighs 'Targeted Killing' Missions: Administration Believes Restraints Do Not Bar Singling Out Individual Terrorists, Washington Post, Sunday, October 28, 2001, p. A01. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.