Dendrite

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Dendrites are the treelike extensions that originate from the soma of the neuron and form electrical and chemical synapses with both dendrites of other cells (dendro-dendritic synapses) and with axons (Axon-dendritic synaspes) and are considered to be the main 'input channels' of a neuron. Initially they were believed to only act as passive receivers of afferent information, as a compatment where summations of axonic inputs summate. It is now clear that the dendrtes of many neurons have complex computational abilities, that some are electrically excitableonduct action potentials, and that some transmit information to other cells including by secreting messengers such as nitric oxide, endocannabinoids and neuropeptides. Different types of neurone differ greatly in their dendritic morphology; some neurons have just one or two long dendrites that have few if any branches; some others have many short dendrites with profuse branches.