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David Lorimer

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David Robinson Lockhart "Lock" Lorimer (1876-1962) was a British officer, first in the Indian Army (1896) and then the Indian Political Service (1903-27). The Indian Political Service extended to the Middle East, and he was British Political Representative in Cairo during the First World War.[1] In the 1920s and 1930s, he published on Asian languages.

His wife, Emily Overend Lorimer, unofficially but powerfully was his aide in Cairo; she had been a tutor at Oxford before they married and later an authority on Nazism. They were both linguists, and he was known for publications about an language called Burushaski spoken in Hunza (in present-day Pakistan).[2] He also had a high regard for the knowledge of Gertrude Bell.[3]

References

  1. Emily Overend Lorimer, Papers of Emily Overend Lorimer, author, editor of 'Basrah Times' 1916-17, wife of Lt-Col David Lorimer, Indian Political Service 1903-27 Mss Eur F177 1902-1949, British Library, Asia, Pacific and Africa Collections; Private Papers [Mss Eur F175 - Mss Eur F199], National Archives (UK)
  2. Julie Flowerday, Society and Environment Publications, Truman State University
  3. Janet Wallach (1999), Desert Queen, Anchor Books, Random House, ISBN 1400096197, p. 149