Bishop

From Citizendium, the Citizens' Compendium
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is a stub and thus not approved.
Main Article
Talk
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and not meant to be cited; by editing it you can help to improve it towards a future approved, citable version. These unapproved articles are subject to a disclaimer.

Bishop (from Greek: ἐπίσκοπος, episkopos, from ἐπί "over" and σκοπός "seeing") is an ordained or consecrated member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. The office of bishop is one of the three ministerial offices within Christianity, the other two being those of priest (presbyter) and deacon. Within the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox Churches, in the Assyrian Church of the East, in the Independent Catholic Churches, and in the Anglican churches, bishops claim Apostolic Succession, a direct historical lineage dating back to the original Twelve Apostles. Within these churches, bishops can ordain clergy including other bishops. Some Protestant churches including the Lutheran and Methodist churches have bishops serving similar functions as well, though not always understood to be within Apostolic Succession in the same sense. The The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints church also has bishops, who serve as spiritual leaders of local congregations (wards). Bishops are of a higher rank than priests.

A diocesan bishop has administrative, pastoral and spiritual responsibility for a diocese.