Acinar cell carcinoma

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Acinar cell carcinomas are malignant tumor arising from secreting cells of a racemose gland, particularly the salivary glands. Racemose (Latin racemosus, full of clusters) refers, as does acinar (Latin acinus, grape), to small saclike dilatations in various glands. [1]

Acinar cell carcinomas are usually well differentiated and account for about 13% of the cancers arising in the parotid gland. Metastasis to the lymph nodes occurs in about 16% of cases. Local recurrences and distant metastases many years after treatment are common. This tumor appears in all age groups and is most common in women. [2]

References

  1. Anonymous (2015), Acinar cell carcinoma (English). Medical Subject Headings. U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  2. Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575 quoted by Medical Subject Headings