Difference between revisions of "William Gardiner"

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'''William Gardiner''' (March 15, 1770, [[Lei­ces­ter]], [[Eng­land]] - No­vem­ber 16, 1853, Leicester) was a musician who introduced the music of his contemporary [[Beethoven]] to Great Britain. Initially following in the footsteps of his father who traded as a [[hosier]], his passion for music became to dominate his life and work. He was an avid performer on the piano and the viola and has left a number of compositions and writings on musical matters but is best known for his work "The Music of Nature".
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'''William Gardiner''' (March 15, 1770, [[Lei­ces­ter]], [[Eng­land]] - No­vem­ber 16, 1853, Leicester) was a musician who introduced the music of his contemporary [[Beethoven]] to Great Britain. Initially following in the footsteps of his father who traded as a [[hosier]], his passion for music became to dominate his life and work. He was an avid performer on the piano and the viola and has left a number of compositions and writings on musical matters but is best known for his work "The Music of Nature"<ref name=Gardiner1832>{{cite book
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| author = Gardiner, W.
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| year = 1832
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| title = The Music of Nature; or, An Attempt to Prove what is Passionate and Pleasing in the Art of Singing,  Speaking, and Performing upon musical instruments, is derived from the Sounds of The Animated World. With Curious Illustrations
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| publisher = London: Longman, Rees et al. / Leicester: T. Combe and Son; and A. Cockshaw
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| url = http://books.google.de/books?id=QwgWAAAAYAAJ
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}}</ref>.
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== References ==
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{{reflist}}

Revision as of 23:08, 2 July 2008

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William Gardiner (March 15, 1770, Lei­ces­ter, Eng­land - No­vem­ber 16, 1853, Leicester) was a musician who introduced the music of his contemporary Beethoven to Great Britain. Initially following in the footsteps of his father who traded as a hosier, his passion for music became to dominate his life and work. He was an avid performer on the piano and the viola and has left a number of compositions and writings on musical matters but is best known for his work "The Music of Nature"[1].


References