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Difference between revisions of "User:Matthew D. Dombrowski"

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The Editor-in-chief, [[Larry Sanger]], insinuated that I'm an idiot for using the word "butthurt."  I used the word after he dismissed my response to his blog post about Wikipedia's so-called "porn problem" as troll bait (and/or silly and/or stupid). When you see him, please ask him to fill out [http://cdn.pophangover.com/wp-content/uploads/butthurt.jpg this form.]
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I'm a midway Millennial who started using computers not long after learning to read.  It's amazing to think that youth today learn to read largely on computers (in whichever of various forms), at least for those children privileged enough to have access to one. I received a public education, primary through tertiary. I currently study American law as a third-year J.D. candidate.
  
 
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I'm excited to join the Citizendium community. I believe strongly in open-access, "open-source" information, and I'm quite intrigued by the concept of a single, global collective of knowledge. We live in a time where neural processes are actively adapting to having endless amounts of data, research, study, and human experience LITERALLY at our fingertips. I can't help but imagine that in the somewhat near future we'll eventually be able to tap directly into knowledge collectives like Citizendium (or that other encyclopedia wiki) without the need for any physical interaction. What that'll mean for education and intelligence as we understand those concepts today I think only future generations will be able to understand.
{{Image|Butthurt.png|left|1024px}}
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...definitely butthurt.
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[[Category:CZ Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]][[Category:Computers Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Education Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Law Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Music Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Philosophy Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Visual Arts Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]]  
 
[[Category:CZ Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]][[Category:Computers Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Education Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Law Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Music Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Philosophy Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]] [[Category:Visual Arts Authors|Dombrowski, Matthew D.]]  
 
{{DEFAULTSORT:Dombrowski, Matthew D.}}
 
{{DEFAULTSORT:Dombrowski, Matthew D.}}

Revision as of 14:01, 1 October 2013

I'm a midway Millennial who started using computers not long after learning to read. It's amazing to think that youth today learn to read largely on computers (in whichever of various forms), at least for those children privileged enough to have access to one. I received a public education, primary through tertiary. I currently study American law as a third-year J.D. candidate.

I'm excited to join the Citizendium community. I believe strongly in open-access, "open-source" information, and I'm quite intrigued by the concept of a single, global collective of knowledge. We live in a time where neural processes are actively adapting to having endless amounts of data, research, study, and human experience LITERALLY at our fingertips. I can't help but imagine that in the somewhat near future we'll eventually be able to tap directly into knowledge collectives like Citizendium (or that other encyclopedia wiki) without the need for any physical interaction. What that'll mean for education and intelligence as we understand those concepts today I think only future generations will be able to understand.