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  • ...iable" that can take on random values. More formally, it is not actually a variable, but a function whose argument takes on a particular value according to so ...',\mathcal{F}')</math> an arbitrary [[measurable space]]. Then a '''random variable''' is any [[measurable function]] ''X'' mapping <math>(\Omega,\mathcal{F})
    2 KB (383 words) - 22:06, 17 October 2007
  • a variable whose value is determined by chance rather than as a result of a known cau
    124 B (20 words) - 13:43, 30 June 2009
  • 12 B (1 word) - 11:05, 17 October 2007
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/Random variable]]. Needs checking by a human.
    814 B (102 words) - 00:54, 12 January 2010

Page text matches

  • ...bility among observed random variables in terms of fewer unobserved random variables called factors.
    179 B (22 words) - 15:38, 15 February 2009
  • ...ical concept intended to formalize the idea that a sequence of essentially random or unpredictable events sometimes is expected to settle into a pattern. ...e]] in the classical sense to a fixed value, perhaps itself coming from a random event
    11 KB (1,680 words) - 00:57, 30 September 2020
  • ...utions of an [[ordinary differential equation]], just as an example), in a random process there is some indeterminacy in its future evolution described by pr ...ss at different times may be [[statistical independence|independent random variables]], in most commonly considered situations they exhibit complicated statis
    12 KB (1,781 words) - 19:50, 7 December 2008
  • ...rwise, if the condition is left random, the result of conditioning is also random. '''Example.''' A fair coin is tossed 10 times; the [[random variable]] <math>X</math> is the number of heads in these 10 tosses, and <math>Y</m
    32 KB (5,149 words) - 20:48, 29 June 2009
  • ...iable" that can take on random values. More formally, it is not actually a variable, but a function whose argument takes on a particular value according to so ...',\mathcal{F}')</math> an arbitrary [[measurable space]]. Then a '''random variable''' is any [[measurable function]] ''X'' mapping <math>(\Omega,\mathcal{F})
    2 KB (383 words) - 22:06, 17 October 2007
  • ...ables|limiting distributions]] of several continuous and [[discrete random variable|discrete]] families of distributions. To indicate that a [[random variable]] ''X'' is normally distributed with mean <math>\mu</math> and variance <m
    46 KB (6,956 words) - 12:01, 9 June 2009
  • ...s of fewer unobserved random variables called '''factors'''. The observed variables are modeled as [[linear combination]]s of the factors, plus "[[errors and ...ulation (statistics)|population]], then the student's 10 scores are random variables. The psychologist's theory may say that, for each of the 10 subjects, th
    16 KB (2,339 words) - 00:24, 30 September 2020
  • two real [[random variable]]s on the same sample space (more precisely, the same [[probability space] of the two variables.
    4 KB (694 words) - 22:27, 25 August 2013
  • two real [[random variable]]s on the same sample space (more precisely, the same [[probability space] of the two variables.
    4 KB (694 words) - 22:28, 25 August 2013
  • ...stic convergence]]. It may be viewed as a notion of convergence for random variables that is similar to, but not the same as, the notion of [[pointwise conver ...is a [[measurable space]]). A (<math>\mathbb{C}^n</math>-valued) '''random variable''' is defined to be any [[measurable function]] <math>X:(\Omega,\mathcal{F
    2 KB (393 words) - 11:53, 14 July 2008
  • {{rpl|Variable (programming)}} {{rpl|Atheris squamigera|Variable bush viper}}
    178 B (21 words) - 08:19, 15 January 2010
  • ...s a height, weight, polling results, test performance, etc., obtained by [[random sampling]] of a population. ...ing samples, for this particular example, of the height of a number of men randomly drawn from the adult male population of ''C''.
    9 KB (1,291 words) - 09:36, 27 June 2009
  • #REDIRECT [[random variable]]
    29 B (3 words) - 11:46, 14 July 2008
  • Function of a discrete random variable yielding the probability that the variable will have a given value.
    143 B (20 words) - 16:01, 4 September 2009
  • is the conventional mathematical model of randomness. something to be chosen at random (outcome of experiment, state of nature, possibility etc.)
    18 KB (2,797 words) - 19:37, 30 January 2011
  • ...ated or spread out things are), and correlation (how related two different variables are). These concepts are further explained in this article. ...s a height, weight, polling results, test performance, etc., obtained by [[random sampling]] of a population.
    15 KB (2,375 words) - 20:59, 25 November 2010
  • that divide the range of a [[random variable]] into two parts such that the random variable is less or equal to it
    3 KB (436 words) - 13:38, 21 January 2010
  • ...into philosophy, Bruce Schneier has a reasonable criterion for a source of random numbers: "It cannot be reliably reproduced."<ref name=Schneier>{{citation ...le to be adequately random with a technique that does not depend on a true random physical process. In other cases, it may be practical to use a combination
    23 KB (3,647 words) - 14:11, 17 August 2013
  • ...esponding to a real-valued random variable; gives the probability that the variable is less than or equal to ''x''; often abbreviated as CDF.
    284 B (39 words) - 10:22, 24 November 2009
  • The probability that the given sequence of random variables converges is 1.
    111 B (14 words) - 11:39, 14 July 2008

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