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  • ...bacteria. The term is most commonly used in its shortened form: phage. The bacteriophage was first shown to be a part of the [[Biology|biological]] world in modern As it turns out, bacteria are often infected with viruses called bacteriophages, and play "host" to them just as the bodies of human beings, plants, and
    25 KB (3,807 words) - 04:44, 15 November 2014
  • 100 B (12 words) - 04:29, 8 July 2008
  • ...al|ToA editor=David Tribe|article url=http://en.citizendium.org/wiki?title=Bacteriophage&oldid=100108666|now=11:47, 20 May 2007|cat1=Biology|date=May 24, 2007}} URL pointer first set at http://en.citizendium.org/wiki?title=Bacteriophage&oldid=100105406 18:09, 16 May 2007 (CDT)
    1 KB (217 words) - 14:33, 25 September 2007
  • 800 B (93 words) - 14:28, 25 September 2007
  • 59 B (6 words) - 14:24, 25 September 2007
  • *[http://www.mansfield.ohio-state.edu/~sabedon/ Bacteriophage Ecology Group] *[http://pubmlst.org/bacteriophages/ Bacteriophage MLST Home Page]
    525 B (68 words) - 09:17, 30 October 2013
  • #REDIRECT [[Bacteriophage experimental evolution]]
    50 B (4 words) - 01:04, 25 June 2007
  • ...annotated references for [[experimental evolution]] studies conducted with bacteriophages, as well as an expansion of a table presented by Breitbart et al. (2005). ADAPTATION AND THE BACTERIOPHAGE
    10 KB (1,507 words) - 07:21, 8 May 2008
  • ...bacteria. The term is most commonly used in its shortened form: phage. The bacteriophage was first shown to be a part of the [[Biology|biological]] world in modern As it turns out, bacteria are often infected with viruses called bacteriophages, and play "host" to them just as the bodies of human beings, plants, and
    25 KB (3,751 words) - 00:57, 9 August 2018
  • ...olutionary theory under carefully designed, reproducible experiments using bacteriophages.
    147 B (15 words) - 13:39, 5 September 2009
  • ...g between selection and population expansion in an experimental lineage of bacteriophage T7. Genetics 161:11-20. ...dependent contrasts succeed where ancestor reconstruction fails in a known bacteriophage phylogeny. Evolution 54:397-405.
    12 KB (1,795 words) - 07:11, 8 May 2008
  • 12 B (1 word) - 07:30, 25 September 2007
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/Bacteriophage experimental evolution]]. Needs checking by a human.
    466 B (58 words) - 16:13, 11 January 2010

Page text matches

  • #REDIRECT [[Bacteriophage experimental evolution]]
    50 B (4 words) - 01:04, 25 June 2007
  • #REDIRECT [[bacteriophage experimental evolution]]
    50 B (4 words) - 01:05, 25 June 2007
  • Study of the interaction of bacteriophages with their environments.
    104 B (12 words) - 10:32, 6 September 2009
  • ...- A French-Canadian bacteriologist, and the discoverer of [[Bacteriophage|bacteriophages]].
    143 B (13 words) - 04:44, 12 September 2008
  • ...olutionary theory under carefully designed, reproducible experiments using bacteriophages.
    147 B (15 words) - 13:39, 5 September 2009
  • (1877 – 1950) - English bacteriologist who discovered that bacteriophages are viruses that attack and destroy bacteria.
    157 B (17 words) - 04:43, 12 September 2008
  • {{rpl|Bacteriophage}}
    222 B (22 words) - 01:16, 21 September 2020
  • *[http://www.mansfield.ohio-state.edu/~sabedon/ Bacteriophage Ecology Group] *[http://pubmlst.org/bacteriophages/ Bacteriophage MLST Home Page]
    525 B (68 words) - 09:17, 30 October 2013
  • *[http://www.phage.org The Bacteriophage Ecology Group (BEG): Home of Phage Ecology and Phage Evolutionary Biology
    335 B (45 words) - 21:09, 24 October 2013
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    446 B (56 words) - 15:58, 11 January 2010
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    481 B (59 words) - 23:07, 11 January 2010
  • ...tériophage et ses Applications Thérapeutiques. Doin, Paris. [French; The Bacteriophage and its Therapeutic Applications] OCLC 14749145 *d'Hérelle, F., and G. H. Smith. 1930. The Bacteriophage and its Clinical Application. p.165-243. Charles C. Thomas, Publisher, Spr
    2 KB (302 words) - 17:59, 15 January 2008
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    514 B (65 words) - 00:29, 12 January 2010
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    541 B (67 words) - 22:26, 11 January 2010
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    528 B (68 words) - 16:32, 11 January 2010
  • {{WgTable |Bacteriophage | Barnardius zonarius |Biology | Connexin | Connexon |Cryonics | DDT | Dea
    471 B (48 words) - 20:56, 23 February 2009
  • {{r|Bacteriophage experimental evolution}} {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    1 KB (167 words) - 23:44, 11 January 2010
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    639 B (82 words) - 21:51, 11 January 2010
  • ...annotated references for [[experimental evolution]] studies conducted with bacteriophages, as well as an expansion of a table presented by Breitbart et al. (2005). ADAPTATION AND THE BACTERIOPHAGE
    10 KB (1,507 words) - 07:21, 8 May 2008
  • {{r|Bacteriophage experimental evolution}}
    794 B (103 words) - 12:44, 8 January 2010
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    830 B (105 words) - 06:49, 30 December 2010
  • ...ort''' (1877-1950) was an English [[bacteriologist]] who discovered that [[bacteriophages]] are [[viruses]] that attack and destroy [[bacteria]]. Twort spent much ...ervations show that Twort had discovered most of the essential features of bacteriophages, although Twort seemed to favor the idea that the principle was not a sep
    9 KB (1,423 words) - 21:37, 23 September 2013
  • ...Twort''' (1877-1950) was an English [[bacteriologist]] who discovered in [[bacteriophages]], the [[viruses]] that attack and destroy [[bacteria]]. Twort spent much ...ervations show that Twort had discovered most of the essential features of bacteriophages, although Twort seemed to favor the idea that the principle was not a sep
    9 KB (1,433 words) - 21:34, 23 September 2013
  • ...g between selection and population expansion in an experimental lineage of bacteriophage T7. Genetics 161:11-20. ...dependent contrasts succeed where ancestor reconstruction fails in a known bacteriophage phylogeny. Evolution 54:397-405.
    12 KB (1,795 words) - 07:11, 8 May 2008
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    983 B (126 words) - 23:07, 11 January 2010
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    1,012 B (130 words) - 21:23, 11 January 2010
  • ...a stub during the writing of the first chapter of the edited monograph, ''Bacteriophage Ecology'' (forecasted publication date: 2007, Cambridge University Press), .../cgi/content/full/103/32/12115], and also individual [[Bacteriophage#Model bacteriophages|phage types]][http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/99/22/14250]).
    14 KB (2,002 words) - 21:06, 24 October 2013
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    1 KB (132 words) - 00:39, 12 January 2010
  • ...[[phage therapy]] and modern [[biological pest control]]. Subsequently, [[bacteriophage]]s became the [[model organism]]s for the studies that spawned much of our ...able virus, but a virus parasitic on bacteria."'' (From F. d'Hérelle, The bacteriophage, Sci. News 14:44-59, 1949.)
    20 KB (3,245 words) - 11:43, 27 August 2013
  • ...[[phage therapy]] and modern [[biological pest control]]. Subsequently, [[bacteriophage]]s became the [[model organism]]s for the studies that spawned much of our ...rable virus, but a virus parasitic on bacteria."'' (From F. d'Herelle, The bacteriophage, Sci. News 14:44-59, 1949.)
    20 KB (3,198 words) - 11:42, 27 August 2013
  • {{r|Bacteriophage experimental evolution}}
    1 KB (143 words) - 15:58, 11 January 2010
  • ...nfect: animal viruses, [[plant virus]]es, [[fungus|fungal]] viruses, and [[bacteriophage]]s (viruses infecting [[bacteria]], which include the most complex viruses ...nd early [[library (biology)|genetic libraries]] were all arrived at using bacteriophages. Certain genetic elements derived from viruses, such as highly effective
    16 KB (2,389 words) - 06:43, 30 December 2010
  • ...bacteria. The term is most commonly used in its shortened form: phage. The bacteriophage was first shown to be a part of the [[Biology|biological]] world in modern As it turns out, bacteria are often infected with viruses called bacteriophages, and play "host" to them just as the bodies of human beings, plants, and
    25 KB (3,807 words) - 04:44, 15 November 2014
  • ...bacteria. The term is most commonly used in its shortened form: phage. The bacteriophage was first shown to be a part of the [[Biology|biological]] world in modern As it turns out, bacteria are often infected with viruses called bacteriophages, and play "host" to them just as the bodies of human beings, plants, and
    25 KB (3,751 words) - 00:57, 9 August 2018
  • ...'''Phage ecology,''' p. 37-46. In R. Calendar and S. T. Abedon (eds.), The Bacteriophages. Oxford University Press, Oxford. ISBN 0-19-514850-9 ...'''Phage ecology,''' p. 129-164. In E. Kutter and A. Sulakvelidze (eds.), Bacteriophages: Biology and Application. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Florida. ISBN 0-8493-133
    23 KB (3,504 words) - 21:08, 24 October 2013
  • {{r|Bacteriophage experimental evolution}} {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    4 KB (486 words) - 00:46, 12 January 2010
  • {{rpl|Bacteriophage}}
    1 KB (144 words) - 16:04, 27 November 2020
  • ...and the discovery of [[bacteriophage]]s, viruses that parasitize bacteria. Bacteriophages proved ideal model organisms for the study of [[genetics]] and [[molecula
    6 KB (911 words) - 22:49, 8 January 2008
  • HGT between distant microbial [[taxon|taxa]] is mediated by [[bacteriophages]], [[plasmids]], [[transposons]], and specialized cellular DNA uptake mec ...cterial DNA is moved from one bacterium to another by a bacterial virus (a bacteriophage, commonly called a [[phage]]).
    30 KB (4,363 words) - 13:54, 7 March 2008
  • ...Taq DNA Polymerase reagents, apparently contaminated with trace amounts of bacteriophage like dnase. A study USING 16s rrna gene primer sA, a number of unexpected ...ore but most were exogenous bacterial DNA. This study is the first to show bacteriophage like DNA present. Scientist and Researchers were made aware of these findi
    14 KB (2,080 words) - 12:00, 18 March 2014
  • ...iled' bacterial [[virus]] from the [[sea]]. Such viruses (usually called [[bacteriophage]]s, or more simply ''phages'' are the most numerous biological entities on ...these are usually called phage (from their scientific name [[Bacteriophage|bacteriophage]], meaning bacterial cell eaters. The figure below shows a phage found in
    28 KB (4,152 words) - 05:34, 29 March 2009
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    2 KB (241 words) - 09:35, 24 February 2010
  • ...ms, such as [[bacteria]]). A virus that infects bacteria is known as a ''[[bacteriophage]]'', often shortened to ''phage''. The study of viruses is known as [[viro * Caudovirales are tailed dsDNA (group I) bacteriophages.
    33 KB (4,988 words) - 16:11, 7 March 2015
  • ...a, optional, replicating [[chromosome]]. Plasmids and bacterial viruses ([[bacteriophages]]) are involved in much movement of mobile DNA between different [[microo ** [[Bacteriophage]]
    22 KB (3,191 words) - 12:32, 31 December 2007
  • {{r|Bacteriophage}}
    3 KB (336 words) - 09:05, 8 June 2009
  • ...of [[peptidoglycann]] in its cell walls. In addition, it is sensitive to [[bacteriophage]] attack; this may be due to the fact that it has no outer membrane.
    7 KB (988 words) - 08:15, 16 February 2010
  • ...ile DNA of bacteria (for instance [[Insertion sequences]] (IS) and mutator bacteriophage Mu). Mobile DNA from the MR chromosome had been found to move to new chrom
    8 KB (1,091 words) - 20:32, 3 November 2007
  • ...s but had switched after WWII. Watson’s reputation as a ‘phage’ man (bacteriophage) was the sort of support they needed to verify their aspirations in biolog
    8 KB (1,309 words) - 23:06, 27 March 2011
  • |event='''1950''': [[Alfred Hershey]] and [[Martha Chase]] use [[bacteriophage]] to confirm DNA is the molecule of heredity.
    8 KB (1,066 words) - 16:36, 15 September 2013
  • *[[Bacteriophage experimental evolution/Definition]]
    15 KB (1,522 words) - 14:12, 6 April 2015
  • ...ng independently. Sanger's lab complete the entire genome of sequence of [[Bacteriophage]] [[Phi-X174 phage|Φ-X174;]].
    18 KB (2,617 words) - 11:31, 9 June 2009
  • ...'' BV: Antibiotics Resistance Patterns, Physiological Characteristics, and Bacteriophage Susceptibility
    18 KB (2,382 words) - 08:24, 16 February 2010
  • Apparently, as has happened today in 2 articles nominated for approval -[[Bacteriophage]] and [[Contraception (medical methods)]], an author has been changing the
    17 KB (2,621 words) - 07:36, 25 February 2012
  • ...nation. Examples of transposons that use replicative transposition include bacteriophage Mu, Tn3 and IS1.
    18 KB (2,605 words) - 12:29, 9 June 2009
  • Some bacterial [[viruses]] ([[bacteriophage]]s) attach to [[receptor (biochemistry)|receptor]]s on sex pili at the sta
    19 KB (2,852 words) - 03:42, 23 October 2011
  • ...s exist. Non-toxic strains can acquire toxicity through a [[lysogenic]] [[bacteriophage]].<ref name=Archivist_1997>{{cite journal | author =''Archivist'' | title
    22 KB (3,310 words) - 06:32, 6 October 2013
  • ...process called [[transformation]]. In the process of [[transduction]], a [[bacteriophage|virus]] can alter the [[DNA]] of a bacterium by becoming [[lysogenic]] and
    26 KB (3,840 words) - 03:44, 23 October 2011
  • ...tle = Independent functions of viral protein and nucleic acid in growth of bacteriophage | url=http://www.jgp.org/cgi/reprint/36/1/39.pdf | journal = J Gen Physiol
    82 KB (12,291 words) - 13:45, 25 October 2013