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  • ...andard English|standard]]', typically [[written language|written]] form of English in the USA. [[linguistics|Linguists]], however, would use it to mean any di :''"Indeed, in many respects, she was quite English, and was an excellent example of the fact that we have really everything in
    3 KB (451 words) - 16:43, 20 April 2014
  • ...to indicate stress and pronunciation: for an explanation and table, see [[English spellings]]; there is also a key at the foot of this page'' ...Grammar|Grammatical]] and lexical differences between British and American English are, for the most part, common to all dialects, but there are many regional
    61 KB (9,638 words) - 14:46, 14 February 2021
  • 12 B (1 word) - 09:36, 12 March 2008
  • Any of the spoken and written variants of the English language originating in the United States of America; widely used around th
    173 B (26 words) - 15:18, 9 May 2008
  • #REDIRECT [[British and American English]]
    42 B (5 words) - 08:14, 22 July 2009
  • | title = British or American English?: A Handbook of Word and Grammar Patterns | title = Divided by a Common Language: A Guide to British and American English
    464 B (57 words) - 04:10, 6 November 2009
  • {{r|British and American English}} {{r|English language}}
    461 B (59 words) - 15:42, 15 February 2011
  • 136 B (17 words) - 01:36, 12 February 2010
  • 12 B (1 word) - 23:35, 19 March 2008
  • 12 B (1 word) - 23:52, 15 May 2011
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/British and American English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    775 B (100 words) - 16:31, 11 January 2010

Page text matches

  • ...andard English|standard]]', typically [[written language|written]] form of English in the USA. [[linguistics|Linguists]], however, would use it to mean any di :''"Indeed, in many respects, she was quite English, and was an excellent example of the fact that we have really everything in
    3 KB (451 words) - 16:43, 20 April 2014
  • ...A further complication is the similarity of Canadian English to [[American English]]. ...ng of words with -''ise''. More modern terminology, however, is frequently American: Canadians usually say ''trunk'' and ''hood'' rather than ''boot'' and ''bo
    4 KB (564 words) - 05:32, 21 October 2013
  • ...to indicate stress and pronunciation: for an explanation and table, see [[English spellings]]; there is also a key at the foot of this page'' ...Grammar|Grammatical]] and lexical differences between British and American English are, for the most part, common to all dialects, but there are many regional
    61 KB (9,638 words) - 14:46, 14 February 2021
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/Commonwealth English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    695 B (92 words) - 20:34, 11 January 2010
  • {{r|British and American English}} {{r|English language}}
    461 B (59 words) - 15:42, 15 February 2011
  • {{r|American English}} {{r|British English}}
    1 KB (158 words) - 13:55, 3 August 2011
  • ...and the English spoken in [[Mozambique]] and [[Rwanda]]. These do not have English as the colonial language: Mozambique was part of the [[Portugal|Portuguese
    1 KB (179 words) - 18:43, 22 March 2014
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/British and American English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    775 B (100 words) - 16:31, 11 January 2010
  • ...of the Philological Society, 40-61) in which he introduced [[The Survey of English Usage]]. ...ase for its new [[The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language|American Heritage Dictionary]], the first dictionary to be compiled using corpus lin
    5 KB (677 words) - 12:31, 26 September 2007
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/British English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    1 KB (168 words) - 16:31, 11 January 2010
  • 'Varieties of English' refers to the many [[dialect]]s of the [[English language]]: {{r|British English}}
    696 B (85 words) - 16:24, 9 January 2011
  • ..., and [[English spellings|spellings]] are ways of writing these sounds. [[English phonemes]] have different spellings depending on a word's provenance and hi ...ced before a consonant, and [[British English|British]] and [[Commonwealth English]] (BrE), where it is not.
    42 KB (7,225 words) - 20:50, 28 April 2017
  • ...unes of different peoples being one reason for the extinction of many more American languages in the last four hundred years.<ref>For more information on langu ...] and [[military]] power of the USA has spread the influence of [[American English]] far beyond U.S. borders.
    3 KB (457 words) - 08:15, 10 June 2008
  • ...onounced [ˈzed] in [[British English]] and [ˈziː] in [[American English|American]], and these are sometimes spelt ''zed'' and ''zee''. ==Use in English==
    4 KB (700 words) - 20:40, 4 April 2017
  • {{subpages}}{{:English spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}}{{TOC|right}} ...spelling]]s'''. This can be seen at its most extravagant in the field of [[English noun#Types of nouns|proper noun]]s&mdash;for example, simply adding an 'h'
    29 KB (5,292 words) - 23:48, 13 April 2017
  • ...'potato chips' (American name). For the heated food see [[French fries]] (American-style) and [[chips (food)|chips]] (British-style).}} ...' (in [[British English]], called '''potato chips''' in [[American English|American]]) are a dry snack food of extremely thin slices of [[potato]] that are gen
    1 KB (166 words) - 18:47, 4 June 2009
  • ...linguists throughout the world to show pronunciation. It is an expanded [[English alphabet]], with the [[Greek alphabet|Greek]] letter theta (θ) representin ...erminology; slashes: /'slæʃɪz/ and brackets: ['brækɪts] in [[American English]].</ref> The former are used for [[phoneme|phonemic]] transcription, the la
    4 KB (728 words) - 00:44, 26 November 2009
  • {{r|English grammar}} {{r|English phonemes}}
    1 KB (123 words) - 15:23, 9 January 2011
  • {{r|Oxford English Dictionary||**}} {{r|American English}}
    654 B (78 words) - 21:40, 9 April 2010
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} ''[[British English|BrE]]'' '''môuld''' = ''[[American English|AmE]]'' '''môld
    11 KB (1,732 words) - 00:33, 7 July 2017
  • {{r|English language}} {{r|American English}}
    217 B (27 words) - 15:04, 30 May 2009
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/English phonemes]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    1 KB (185 words) - 21:19, 11 January 2010
  • ...Notes towards a description''. Schools Council Program in Linguistics and English Teaching, papers series 2 (No. 2). London: Longmans, for the Schools Counci * [[Mark Aronoff|Aronoff, Mark]]. (1978). An English spelling convention. ''Linguistic Inquiry'', ''9'', 299-303.
    5 KB (618 words) - 03:09, 19 March 2010
  • ...ish, the question of national identity and culture in the early moments of American independence, and the poetics of citation and of definition. * "Noah Webster" in ''The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes'' (1907–21). vol 18 section 25:33 [http://www.ba
    4 KB (585 words) - 20:37, 10 August 2011
  • ...standards such as [[British English]], [[American English]], [[Australian English]]...
    2 KB (250 words) - 12:35, 5 August 2011
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/Canadian English]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|American English}}
    557 B (72 words) - 16:37, 11 January 2010
  • {{r|American English}} {{r|British English}}
    763 B (95 words) - 19:01, 9 March 2015
  • #REDIRECT [[British and American English]]
    42 B (5 words) - 08:14, 22 July 2009
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} ...ften italicised and ending in written -'''''é''''', see [[French words in English]]: -'''e'''
    36 KB (5,897 words) - 00:42, 23 August 2017
  • ...oalition of [[Native American]]s against [[England|English colonists]]; an English victory
    190 B (26 words) - 02:19, 12 September 2009
  • ...ionary that was first published in 1828 as ''An American Dictionary of the English Language''. ...llege [[Ezra Stiles]]. Webster's four years at Yale overlapped with the [[American Revolution]], and because of food shortages, many of his college classes we
    16 KB (2,437 words) - 18:13, 12 August 2011
  • ...andard English|standard]]', typically [[written language|written]] form of English in the UK and especially southern [[England]]. [[linguistics|Linguists]], h ...te)|Republic of Ireland]], where 'British' spellings are part of [[Hiberno-English]].
    7 KB (990 words) - 16:38, 9 January 2011
  • **[[English spellings/Catalogs/Apostrophe]] {{r|English phonemes}}
    485 B (63 words) - 19:37, 14 September 2011
  • '''Regular verbs''' in '''English''' have four forms: ...how stress and pronunciation: see [[English spellings]] for a table and [[English phonemes]] for the [[International Phonetic Alphabet|IPA]]. There is also a
    13 KB (2,513 words) - 11:06, 28 January 2017
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} mostly schwa; stressed -'''ër''' in some words; [[British and American English|some AmE -'''er''' words are -'''re''' in BrE]]: -'''er
    13 KB (2,002 words) - 23:55, 2 August 2017
  • ...[[River Wye]], ''why'' pronounced with an English accent (i.e. without the American, Scottish etc. aspiration of ''wh''). ==Use in English==
    6 KB (1,096 words) - 15:09, 19 December 2016
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''Mâpplethorpe''' ''Robert'' *Mâplethorpe: unusual flouting of [[English spellings#Double letters|double-consonant rule]] in person's name, cf. '''m
    21 KB (3,209 words) - 13:09, 5 September 2017
  • ...(letter)|B]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. Its English name is pronounced [ˈeɪ], like the [[strong form]] of the indefinite arti ==Use in English==
    15 KB (2,623 words) - 17:05, 10 August 2017
  • ...phonemes#Vowels and diphthongs]], list of all the vowel sounds of standard English; scroll down for '''the schwa sound''' {{r|British and American English}}
    959 B (133 words) - 22:41, 31 January 2013
  • | title = British or American English?: A Handbook of Word and Grammar Patterns | title = Divided by a Common Language: A Guide to British and American English
    464 B (57 words) - 04:10, 6 November 2009
  • ...ues in a number of languages using the [[Latin alphabet]], especially in [[English]], [[Irish Gaelic|Irish and]] [[Scottish Gaelic]], [[Cornish]], [[Italian]] ==Use in English==
    4 KB (585 words) - 03:40, 9 June 2016
  • A '''theatre''' (spelt '''theater''' in [[American English|US English]]) is a structure in which [[theatre|theatrical]] or dramatic works, often *[[Cinema]] (American English "movie theater")
    4 KB (553 words) - 23:09, 21 September 2020
  • {{r|American cuisine}} {{r|American culture}}
    4 KB (531 words) - 18:53, 11 March 2021
  • ...o known as the Big Dipper (in American English) and the Plough (in British English).
    440 B (56 words) - 18:01, 29 October 2011
  • ...her languages, of comparable (or superior--smiling broadly) quality to the English-language one. * [[American Cryonics Society]]
    25 KB (3,596 words) - 09:17, 21 April 2012
  • ...similarities between languages as apparently diverse as [[English language|English]], [[Japanese language|Japanese]] and [[Arabic language|Arabic]]? What are ...to speakers of that language.</ref> is unacceptable in [[English language|English]], but children recognise as much long before they receive any formal gramm
    30 KB (4,399 words) - 17:14, 2 October 2014
  • The name in American English for ''Solanum melongena'', a perennial cultivated for its edible fruits.
    137 B (18 words) - 21:53, 31 May 2008
  • ....S. politics and education prefer terms such as 'pro-English' or 'official English'. ...Discrimination Complaint]'. December 6 2006. See also ''Bill may push for English only: State-documents idea called rights violation'' (''Columbus Dispatch''
    7 KB (1,019 words) - 08:10, 10 June 2008
  • ...(informally '''note''' in [[British English]] and '''bill''' in [[American English]]; also called '''paper money''') is a written assurance of payment to the
    1 KB (191 words) - 20:23, 28 August 2013
  • Auto-populated based on [[Special:WhatLinksHere/English alphabet]]. Needs checking by a human. {{r|British English}}
    1 KB (172 words) - 21:19, 11 January 2010
  • ''Works cited in the [[Canadian English]] article'' *Lilles J (2000) 'The myth of Canadian English'. ''English Today'' 16: 3-9, 17.
    428 B (55 words) - 09:20, 26 April 2008
  • ...as the [[Juan de Fuca Plate]] is [[subduction|subducted]] below the North American Plate. The most recent large eruption was the explosion in 1980 of [[Mount ...and runs to the [[Mendocino Triple Junction]] at the borders of the North American Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate, and the [[Pacific Plate]]. The fault runs fu
    36 KB (5,120 words) - 18:54, 11 March 2021
  • ...[British English]], ''tramway''; also known as ''streetcar'' in [[American English]]) is a rail vehicle for use in urban areas. Trams are almost exclusively u
    1 KB (171 words) - 07:25, 19 March 2010
  • ...ng African American Poetry" by Jerry W. Ward, Jr., from ''Teaching African American Literature'' by M. Graham, Routledge, 1998, page 146.</ref> ...t of [[American literature]], with books such as ''[[Roots: The Saga of an American Family]]'' by [[Alex Haley]], ''[[The Color Purple]]'' by [[Alice Walker]],
    39 KB (5,962 words) - 15:38, 27 December 2020
  • ...f followers in [[North America]], including traditionally Buddhist [[Asian American]]s as well as non-Asian converts. America presents a strikingly new and dif ...built in 1853 in [[San Francisco]] by the [[Sze Yap Company]], a [[Chinese American]] fraternal society. Another society, the [[Ning Yeong Company]], built a s
    49 KB (7,547 words) - 08:41, 1 November 2013
  • ...}</noinclude>(c. 1612 - 1672) Colonial American poet, considered the first English poet in the New World.
    127 B (17 words) - 18:30, 23 July 2009
  • ...Oxford American Dictionary'' or ''The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language'', say &mdash; and you try to use it to learn the 'meaning'<ref>We ...itive concepts''" (Wierzbicka, 1996). She gives one example comparing the English sentence, "I want to do this", with its equivalent in Russian. Although sh
    23 KB (3,574 words) - 17:13, 3 September 2011
  • ...enator]]" or "Senator Kerry is a Democrat," is standard [[American English|American]] usage, while "Kerry is a Democrat Senator" is controversial. ...006).</ref> The earliest known use of the term, according to the ''Oxford English Dictionary'', was in Britain in 1890: "Whether a little farmer...is going t
    14 KB (2,080 words) - 10:49, 27 August 2013
  • ...or [ˈaːɹ], like the word ''are'' (with that '''r''' silent in [[British English]] finally or before a consonant: ''ah''). ==Use in English==
    8 KB (1,297 words) - 12:16, 10 April 2014
  • .... In some cases, as with [[Vernon Winslow]], a.k.a. "DJ Daddy-O," African-Americans were hired to coach white announcers.
    3 KB (436 words) - 17:14, 11 June 2009
  • ===List of French words in English=== ...lics (both optionally), or have a strange or little-known pronunciation in English, in any combination.
    63 KB (10,748 words) - 01:33, 5 May 2017
  • ...(letter)|R]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. Its English name is pronounced [ˈkjuː], like the words ''cue'' and ''queue''. ==Use in English==
    4 KB (583 words) - 00:17, 15 May 2016
  • Like a [[full-stop]] ([[British English]], known as a period in [[American English]]), a colon can follow a grammatically complete utterance. The same is true
    3 KB (422 words) - 14:31, 22 April 2014
  • * ''Town and County Government in the English Colonies of North America.'' JHUSHPS, 2nd ser., no. 10. Baltimore: Johns Ho * ''Topics and References in American History, 1492-1783: Printed for the Use of Students in History.'' Cambridge
    6 KB (872 words) - 02:56, 15 September 2013
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''vîse''' ''grip'': [[American English|American]] alternative spelling of '''vîce''' in this sense only
    4 KB (606 words) - 10:29, 20 July 2017
  • ...(1758-1843) US lexicographer who compiled the ''American Dictionary of the English Language'' and wrote a widely used ''Speller'' for use in schools in the te
    223 B (32 words) - 15:05, 20 March 2009
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''únto''' *úntû, unlike '''ínto''' and '''ónto''', used in modern English only in certain set expressions (e.g. '''do únto òthers''' *dû úntû ú
    4 KB (699 words) - 20:49, 1 April 2017
  • ...es-poo-diving-shop-japan.jpg|thumb|right|300px|Japanese [[English language|English]] trade names may cause some amusement for those accustomed to other meanin ...ese-speakers non-fluent in English may pronounce 'English'), or the use of English as a working language in certain institutions such as research centres or p
    9 KB (1,370 words) - 03:35, 16 February 2010
  • ...'[[lexical category]]'', distinct from other classes such as ''[[verb]]''. English [[Word (language)|words]] may be used as nouns if they accept certain [[gra ..., or with inflections and affixes that modify words. In [[English language|English]], for instance, it is not obvious whether 'bank' is a noun or a verb until
    5 KB (891 words) - 05:37, 8 November 2010
  • ...born in [[Buenos Aires]]. He grew up speaking and reading both Spanish and English, and spending his teen years in Europe, he learned several other languages ...e of fiction and thus opened the way to a remarkable generation of Spanish American novelists."<ref>Coetzee, J.M., "Borges's Dark Mirror", ''New York Review of
    44 KB (6,841 words) - 04:32, 8 October 2013
  • ...d community theatre groups. Lines from these works have become part of the English language, such as "[[short, sharp shock]]", "What, never? Well, hardly ever ...tp://www.bartelby.net/223/0815.html ''The Cambridge History of English and American Literature''], Volume XIII, Chapter VIII, Section 15 (1907–21)</ref>
    59 KB (9,441 words) - 14:45, 22 March 2021
  • <noinclude>{{Subpages}}</noinclude>English-American hard rock band founded in [[Los Angeles]], [[California]], comprising of si
    239 B (30 words) - 16:13, 8 February 2014
  • ...U.S. call all Northerners "Yankees", and people outside the U.S. call all Americans "Yankees" or "Yanks." ...h descent, yet they continue to have disproportionate influence over major American institutions, especially cultural, educational, business and financial ones
    9 KB (1,280 words) - 23:38, 14 February 2010
  • {{r|English language}} {{r|American English}}
    332 B (40 words) - 10:11, 31 May 2009
  • ...(letter)|P]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. Its English name is pronounced [ˈəʊ] or [ˈoʊ], like the exclamation ''oh!'' ==Use in English==
    14 KB (2,413 words) - 13:50, 11 November 2016
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} [[British English|BrE]] ''barrier, drink'' '''bàr''' = ''sheep'' '''bàa'''
    6 KB (884 words) - 18:10, 13 May 2017
  • ...t transportations. As opposed to what are called [[railroad]]s in American English, they have stayed active and efficient, and indeed often serve what would b
    303 B (47 words) - 17:15, 1 June 2009
  • {{r|African American literature}} {{r|British and American English}}
    3 KB (354 words) - 21:41, 11 January 2010
  • |Asl-i-love-you.jpg|''I love you'' in [[American Sign Language]]. ....jpg|An example of [[written language]] - in this case, [[English language|English]].
    3 KB (428 words) - 22:19, 18 August 2008
  • ...small amount of literature from the US is written in other languages than English, especially in [[Spanish]]. ...he literary outcome of the former colonies gradually found its own unique 'American' voice and formed its own literary tradition.
    9 KB (1,379 words) - 16:03, 15 November 2013
  • ...difficulty of such an undertaking -- particularly with a language such as English which has a relatively high proportion of irregular and inconsistent usage ...of words rather than their categorization, is preferred. Particularly with English, the model is useful, as we have so many words capable of functioning as se
    6 KB (1,036 words) - 17:34, 15 February 2010
  • ...fficially called '''Moldovan''' (in Romanian: ''limba moldovenească''; in English: ''Moldovan'' or rarely ''Moldavian''). ...nces are insignificant compared with those of British English and American English.
    8 KB (1,239 words) - 09:55, 25 September 2011
  • {{r|African American Vernacular English}} {{r|Singapore English}}
    653 B (75 words) - 07:57, 7 March 2010
  • {{r|British and American English}}
    468 B (61 words) - 22:49, 11 January 2010
  • ...1916) was an American-born writer who in 1915 by naturalization became an English citizen. He was the younger brother of the pragmatist philosopher [[William ...ings of the Dove (1902); The Golden Bowl (1904); English Hours (1905); The American Scene (1907); The High Bid (1909); Italian Hours (1909).
    1 KB (144 words) - 21:34, 15 August 2010
  • {{r|American English}} {{r|Canadian English}}
    319 B (41 words) - 20:51, 10 August 2011
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} '''râbid''' ([[American English|AmE]] can be '''á''')
    15 KB (2,228 words) - 19:59, 28 May 2017
  • * [[Clara Bow]], American actress * [[Richard Brautigan]], American writer and poet
    23 KB (3,486 words) - 10:29, 2 August 2011
  • {{:English_spellings/Catalogs/Masterlist}} see [[English irregular nouns]]: -'''ôes'''
    11 KB (1,818 words) - 23:29, 13 April 2017
  • [[Orientalism]] is the western (European and American) study of "the Orient" in its traditional, more expansive, sense. During th ...cidental" is still sometimes used to refer to Europeans (and by extension, Americans of European origin).
    9 KB (1,441 words) - 04:41, 16 April 2014
  • ...nch (tool)|wrench]]''' ([[American English]]), or '''spanner''' ([[British English]]), is a [[fastening tool]] used to manipulate threaded fasteners such as [ ...s. 1/2", 3/4", and 1" drives are used for heavy equipment. Both metric and English system sockets, however, can snap onto the male end of the shaft.
    9 KB (1,487 words) - 07:17, 25 October 2013
  • ...rred to as a '''vapor'''<ref>American spelling: the [[British and American English|British variant]] is '''vapour'''</ref>) is one of the four major [[Physics
    8 KB (1,191 words) - 00:28, 23 January 2011
  • '''Quotation marks''', or (especially in British English) '''inverted commas''', also called, less formally, ''speech marks'' or ''q ...g>'''“'''...'''”'''</big> and <big>'''‘'''...'''’'''</big> as in [[English]] and many other languages,
    18 KB (2,421 words) - 10:14, 25 September 2011
  • ...use it widely; it ranks between ca. 300-500 in frequency of use in written English.<ref name=frequency/> ...|url=http://www.conlang.info/wordfreq.html |title=Word Frequency List for English}}.
    9 KB (1,370 words) - 23:04, 9 September 2012
  • ...an important [[second language]] for millions more, from [[American people|American]]s interested in the language as a link to their forefathers, to [[business ...to read such thinkers in the original German if at all possible. In fact, English nowadays sports a huge unabridged dictionary, but German does not have need
    15 KB (2,169 words) - 08:54, 22 October 2008
  • {{r|British and American English}} {{r|English language}}
    1 KB (172 words) - 01:32, 12 January 2010
  • ...(letter)|I]], as is the case for instance in the [[English alphabet]]. Its English name is pronounced [ˈeɪtʃ], ''aitch'', as in 'he drops his aitches', ref ==Use in English==
    9 KB (1,572 words) - 14:23, 18 July 2017
  • ...ing countries. The name has [[pagan]] origins and is taken from the [[Old English]] for Woden’s Day. ...as been considered the middle of the working week. In American colloquial English, it is often referred to as ‘hump day’, since arriving at Wednesday mea
    527 B (84 words) - 08:46, 7 April 2010
  • ==In English== {{:English spellings/Accents}}
    24 KB (3,611 words) - 21:37, 26 May 2017
  • ...red 14b Long Haired St. Bernard 15 Newfoundland 16 Bull Terrior 17 English Bulldog 18 French Dwarf Bulldog 19 Pug Dog.}} *[[American Eskimo]](''see also [[German Spitz]]'')
    22 KB (2,655 words) - 08:02, 8 June 2009

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