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Difference between revisions of "Sgraffito"

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'''Sgraffito''', (from the Italian sgraffire, or ''scratched'', also written as ''Sgraffiti'' as plural) is a visual arts technique used in ceramics, pottery, painting and glass in which a top layer of surface colour is scratched away to reveal another colour underneath.
 
'''Sgraffito''', (from the Italian sgraffire, or ''scratched'', also written as ''Sgraffiti'' as plural) is a visual arts technique used in ceramics, pottery, painting and glass in which a top layer of surface colour is scratched away to reveal another colour underneath.
  
 
Sgraffito wares were produced by Islamic potters and was a technique widely used in the Middle East. Sgraffito as architectural adornment can be seen on the surfaces of German and Bohemian buildings dating from the Renaissance.
 
Sgraffito wares were produced by Islamic potters and was a technique widely used in the Middle East. Sgraffito as architectural adornment can be seen on the surfaces of German and Bohemian buildings dating from the Renaissance.

Revision as of 03:06, 23 March 2008

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Sgraffito, (from the Italian sgraffire, or scratched, also written as Sgraffiti as plural) is a visual arts technique used in ceramics, pottery, painting and glass in which a top layer of surface colour is scratched away to reveal another colour underneath.

Sgraffito wares were produced by Islamic potters and was a technique widely used in the Middle East. Sgraffito as architectural adornment can be seen on the surfaces of German and Bohemian buildings dating from the Renaissance.