Difference between revisions of "Ajax the Lesser"

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In the [[Iliad]] '''Ajax the Lesser''' is a notable [[Ancient Greece|Greek]] warrior, the leader of the Locrians.  A more accurate transcription of his name is "Aias".  He is called "the Lesser" because he is smaller than Great Ajax, the biggest and strongest fighter among the Greeks apart from [[Achilles]]. The two Ajaxes were frequently together in the fighting.  [[Homer]] depicts the lesser Ajax as particularly good at running.
[[Image:Trojan horse in Troja, Prague 2717.JPG|thumb|right|300px|alt=Wooden horse.|Armed Greek warriors hid quietly inside a giant wooden horse in a brilliant ruse which ended the Trojan War.<small>Pictured: a wooden horse in [[Prague]].</small>]]
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'''Ajax the Lesser''' was a [[Ancient Greece|Greek]] warrior hiding inside the [[Trojan horse]] along with [[Odysseus]] and [[Agamemnon]]; when it was wheeled inside the walls of [[Troy]] based on a deceptive and brilliant [[military]] [[strategy]], the fighters emerged during the night from the hollow belly of the horse, opened the gates of Troy, which let in returning Greek fighters from the ships. As a result, Troy was sacked and burned in the ensuing battle which ended the decades-long [[Trojan War]]. Knowledge of the war is according to sources from Greek and Roman [[mythology]] such as [[Homer]], who wrote the ''[[Iliad]]'' and ''[[Odyssey]]'', as well as the Roman [[poetry|poet]] [[Virgil]] who wrote the ''[[Aeneid]]'' centuries later.
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Latest revision as of 22:15, 5 January 2016

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In the Iliad Ajax the Lesser is a notable Greek warrior, the leader of the Locrians. A more accurate transcription of his name is "Aias". He is called "the Lesser" because he is smaller than Great Ajax, the biggest and strongest fighter among the Greeks apart from Achilles. The two Ajaxes were frequently together in the fighting. Homer depicts the lesser Ajax as particularly good at running.