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User:Daniel Mietchen/Sandbox/Sitemap-Science-2.0

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Background

This is a sitemap of the Citizendium, cut off after 427 pages and reformatted using the {{r}} template. It was created on 13 March 2010 (UTC) with http://www.xml-sitemaps.com/, using http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/Science_2.0 as the Starting URL.

List

  • Developing Article Blog [r]: A type of website, usually personal, often organized with posts in reverse chronological order. [e]
  • Developing Article Wiki [r]: A website that allows anyone (with registration required or not) to edit any page and to add new pages. [e]
  • Social network [r]: An abstract or formal structure of serial social relations consisting of nodes (persons or roles) and links (the relations between nodes). [e]
  • Stub Database [r]: A collection of computer-readable records, at one or more location, that are organized in some meaningful way beyond simple sequence of creation [e]
  • Developed Article Cloud computing [r]: Use of computer networks, especially the Internet, to access computer resources, operated by a third party; access is on-demand and dynamically assigned — cloud computing differs from managed hosting with resources dedicated to users [e]
  • Developing Article Telemedicine [r]: The use of electronic communications to enable providers to diagnose, provide information, and deliver health services when they are not available for on-site service delivery [e]
  • Society (disambiguation) [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Stub Open science [r]: A movement aimed at making the process of scientific research more transparent both within and beyond the scientific community, and at sharing its results with the widest possible audience. [e]
  • Developing Article Open source software [r]: Software where the source code is freely modifiable and redistributable. [e]
  • Stub Knowledge [r]: On one common account by philosophers, justified, true belief; often used in a looser way by everyone else to mean any truth or belief, and also a whole body of truth or a whole system of belief. [e]
  • Stub Hypothesis [r]: A causal relationship thought possible. [e]
  • Theory [r]: An abstract description of causal relationships. [e]
  • Stub Scientific journal [r]: A publication venue for original research and scholarly review articles — for more than three centuries on paper and now increasingly online. [e]
  • Developing Article Human Genome Project [r]: Genetic sequencing project that has mapped the entirety of one human genome. [e]
  • Developing Article Theoretical biology [r]: The study of biological systems by theoretical means. [e]
  • Developing Article Charles Darwin [r]: (1809 – 1882) English natural scientist, most famous for proposing the theory of natural selection. [e]
  • René Descartes [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Developing Article Francis Bacon [r]: (1561-1626) English Renaissance essayist and philosopher who argued that science should proceed empirically, by induction. [e]
  • Developing Article Induction (philosophy) [r]: Inference from observations, subject to revision when further observations are made. [e]
  • Developed Article Karl Popper [r]: (1902–1994) One of the most influential philosophers of science of the 20th century. [e]
  • Developing Article Thomas Kuhn [r]: (1921–1996) American philosopher who revolutionized philosophy of science by describing science as being driven by paradigm-defining revolutions rather than steady progress. [e]
  • Stub Ptolemy [r]: (2nd century AD) Egyptian astronomer and geographer whose main work, the Almagest, a compendium of contemporary astronomical knowledge, was in use into the 15th century. [e]
  • Developed Article Nicolaus Copernicus [r]: (1473–1543) Astronomer, founder of the heliocentric system. [e]
  • Developing Article Albert Einstein [r]: 20th-century physicist who formulated the theories of relativity. [e]
  • Paradigm [r]: Defined by Thomas Kuhn as an entire constellation of beliefs, values and techniques etc. shared by the members of a given community [e]
  • Developing Article Laws of thermodynamics [r]: Laws which describe the specifics for the transport of heat and work in thermodynamic processes. [e]
  • Developing Article Laws of thermodynamics [r]: Laws which describe the specifics for the transport of heat and work in thermodynamic processes. [e]
  • Developing Article Laws of thermodynamics [r]: Laws which describe the specifics for the transport of heat and work in thermodynamic processes. [e]
  • Developing Article Laws of thermodynamics [r]: Laws which describe the specifics for the transport of heat and work in thermodynamic processes. [e]
  • Developing Article Evolution [r]: A change over time in the proportions of individual organisms differing genetically. [e]
  • Developing Article Natural selection [r]: The differential survival and/or reproduction of classes of entities that differ in one or more characteristics [e]
  • Developing Article Intelligent design [r]: Claim that fundamental features of the universe and living things are best explained by purposeful causation. [e]
  • Developing Article Isaac Newton [r]: (1642–1727) English physicist and mathematician, best known for his elucidation of the universal theory of gravitation and his development of calculus. [e]
  • Developing Article Quantum mechanics [r]: An important branch of physics dealing with the behavior of matter and energy at very small scales. [e]
  • Developing Article Endosymbiotic theory [r]: Theory on the origins of mitochondria and plastids (e.g. chloroplasts), which are organelles of eukaryotic cells. [e]
  • Developing Article Richard Dawkins [r]: British ethologist, evolutionary biologist; writer and broadcaster on science and atheism (born 1941). [e]
  • Developing Article Rudolf Carnap [r]: (1891–1970) Philosopher, a leading member of the Vienna Circle and an advocate of logical positivism [e]
  • Developing Article Aristotle [r]: (384-322 BCE) Ancient Greek philosopher and scientist, and one of the most influential figures in the western world between 350 BCE and the sixteenth century. [e]
  • Developing Article Galileo Galilei [r]: (1564-1642) Italian scientist, a pioneer in combining mathematical theory with systematic experiment in science, who came into conflict with the Church. [e]
  • Developing Article Computer [r]: A machine that executes a sequence of instructions. [e]
  • Stub Web browser [r]: A computer program that retrieves and renders webpages to display information stored on a web server. [e]
  • Developing Article Email [r]: A method of composing, sending, storing, and receiving messages over electronic communication systems. [e]
  • Stub Request for Comments [r]: A Request for Comments (RFC) is one of a series of documents about the Internet, mostly technical, but some about policy issues; some become de facto Internet standards, which set the engineering specifications for the internals of the Internet, while many others languish largely or completely ignored. [e]
  • Hyperlink [r]: A reference in a computer document to a website document in another place; clicking on it brings the user to the hyperlinked document. [e]
  • Developing Article HTTP [r]: Network protocol on which the World Wide Web is based. [e]
  • External Article Book [r]: A bound set of sheets containing written or printed materials, or space for such. [e]
  • External Article Library [r]: Collection of books and periodicals. [e]
  • External Article Printing press [r]: Device for making multiple paper copies of text, invented by Johannes Gutenberg in the 1440s. [e]
  • Developing Article Telephone [r]: Telecommunications device that transmits and receives sound, most commonly the human voice, by converting the sound waves to pulses of electrical current, and then retranslating the current back to sound. [e]
  • Developing Article Earth [r]: The third planet from the Sun in our solar system; the only place in the universe known by humanity to harbor life. [e]
  • Developing Article Cascading Style Sheets [r]: A format designed by the W3C for describing the presentation, layout and other design choices of a document on the Web. [e]
  • Stub XHTML [r]: a form of web page markup language which is similar to HTML but adheres to stricter syntax rules, being based on XML [e]
  • Stub JavaScript [r]: General-purpose computer programming language that is frequently embedded within HTML pages on the World Wide Web to make pages more interactive. [e]
  • Stub Website [r]: A collection of pages that provide content. [e]
  • Stub Multicasting [r]: In networking, the transmission of a piece of information such that its destination address is recognized by multiple targets of a multicast group. Broadcasting is a special case of the multicast group, when the group contains all addresses. [e]
  • Developing Article Peer-to-peer [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Approved Article Domain Name System [r]: The Internet service which translates to and from IP addresses and domain names. [e]
  • Developing Article MEDLINE [r]: The U.S. National Library of Medicine's® (NLM) premier bibliographic database that contains over 16 million references to journal articles in life sciences with a concentration on biomedicine. [e]
  • Developing Article Directory service [r]: A function that maps to and from human-readable names and computer-readable addresses, not intended to be a search engine [e]
  • Developed Article Virtualization [r]: In computing, a broad term that usually refers to the abstraction of resources on a computer, using a container such as a "virtual machine" or several "virtual machines." Usually this is accomplished using either a virtual machine or an operating system that has tools to enable virtual environments to run inside it. [e]
  • Developing Article Managed hosting [r]: A third-party organization that provides computing services that primarily supports information technology infrastructure rather than end user services [e]
  • Developing Article Software as a Service [r]: A type of cloud computing in which the vendor delivers a specific type of application, such as social networking, medical billing, or other customizable but well-defined function that requires neither application development nor expenditure on servers and data centers [e]
  • Salesforce.com [r]: One of the first successful cloud computing vendors, with its best-known Software as a Service offering being one for customer relationship management [e]
  • Developing Article Sarbanes-Oxley Act [r]: Enacted in 2002 in response to major accounting scandals resulting in the collapse of major U.S. corporations, a strict set of rules for financial responsibility and audit in public companies; currently being challenged as overkill [e]
  • Developing Article Small and home office [r]: A computing and networking environment characterized by a small number of computers, telephones, and video outputs; a lack of professional systems administration staff; and difficulty in cabling to computers elsewhere on the premises [e]
  • Developing Article Simple Mail Transfer Protocol [r]: In the Internet Protocol Suite, SMTP is the basic method for transferring the "envelopes" of electronic mail among servers performing the electronic "post office" function, not the user mailbox function. [e]
  • Stub Post Office Protocol [r]: A client-server messaging protocol in the Internet Protocol Suite, which pulls messages from a mail storage server to the client machine. [e]
  • External Article Internet Message Access Protocol [r]: A client-server messaging protocol in the Internet Protocol Suite, which allows managing messages on the server. [e]
  • Developing Article Form factor [r]: Physical size of a device including linear dimensions, mounting and connector standards, and other parameters that categorize the item as belonging to a mechanically compatible family. [e]
  • Developing Article Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks [r]: (RAID) In computing, the use of multiple, active physical storage media to store one logical copy of data, to improve performance, fault tolerance, or both [e]
  • Developing Article Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 [r]: A set of legislative initiatives and technical frameworks for improving the secure and reliable delivery of government services over electronic media [e]
  • Developing Article Availability [r]: In the context of providing an information service, the property that authorized users can depend on being able to use it whenever it is needed [e]
  • Stub Confidentiality [r]: Assurance that information will not be disclosed to unauthorized parties [e]
  • Developing Article Integrity [r]: In information security, the assurance that data retrieved from an information system has the same meaning as when it was entered [e]
  • Developing Article Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act [r]: The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), public law 104-191, is a statute enacted by the 104th U. S. Congress on August 21, 1996; it's primary impact is on protecting the confidentiality of health-case data. [e]
  • Developing Article Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 [r]: A set of legislative initiatives and technical frameworks for improving the secure and reliable delivery of government services over electronic media [e]
  • Stub Electrocardiogram [r]: Recording of the electrical activity of the heart on a moving strip of paper. [e]
  • Developing Article Telephone [r]: Telecommunications device that transmits and receives sound, most commonly the human voice, by converting the sound waves to pulses of electrical current, and then retranslating the current back to sound. [e]
  • Developing Article Facsimile [r]: A means of sending copies of paper documents, over conventional telephone networks or over Internet protocol [e]
  • Developing Article Universal emergency telephone number system [r]: A single, short telephone number, such as 911 or 112, which will connect the caller to a dispatcher capable of determining the need for ambulance, police, fire or other emergency services, and arranging for the service(s) to get to the location where the problem exists [e]
  • Developing Article Emergency medical system [r]: Under physician control, a system beginning with methods for invoking it, delivering field medicine and transporting patients by emergency medical technicians, emergency physician response and triage [e]
  • Stub Canada [r]: The world's second-largest country by total area, occupying most of northern North America; officially a bilingual nation, in English and French (population approx. 27 million). [e]
  • Developing Article Public [r]: Shared by, open or available to everyone, well or generally known, universally available or without limit, done or made on behalf of the community as a whole, open to general or unlimited viewing or disclosure, frequented by large numbers of people or for general use, or places generally open or visible to all pertaining to official matters or maintained at taxpayer expense. [e]
  • American Library Association [r]: Formed "to provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all. library service and librarianship; it focuses in five areas: Diversity, Equity of Access, Education and Continuous Learning, intellectual freedom, and 21st Century Literacy; Advisory Committee, Congressional Internet Caucus [e]
  • Developing Article Institute of Medicine [r]: Nonprofit honorific membership organization dedicated to serving as advisor to the nation to improve health. [e]
  • External Article Publishing [r]: The process of production and dissemination of literature or information - the activity of making information available for public view. [e]
  • Developing Article Word (language) [r]: A unit of language, often regarded as 'minimally distinctive' and used to build larger structures such as phrases; languages vary in how distinctive word units are and how much they may be modified. [e]
  • Developing Article Literacy [r]: The competency to understand (and usually use) written language. [e]
  • Scientist [r]: A person employing the scientific method to gather information about a system of interest; often used in the narrow sense of people engaged with natural sciences. [e]
  • Developing Article World Wide Web [r]: A global collection of information presented in the form of documents hosted on networked computers and available to the public. [e]
  • Developing Article Computer [r]: A machine that executes a sequence of instructions. [e]
  • Stub Inflation [r]: An increase in the general level of the prices of goods and services. [e]
  • Stub Librarian [r]: A person who is responsible for a collection of books, magazines, records, specialized or technical information, or materials, which are stored for use. [e]
  • Developing Article United Arab Emirates [r]: Federation of the seven arabian states Abu Dhabi, Ajman, Dubai, Fujeirah, Ras al-Khaimah, Sharjah, and Umm al-Quwain. [e]
  • Developing Article Slovenia [r]: Former Yugoslav republic (population c. 2 million; capital Ljubljana) at the north-eastern end of the Adriatic Sea, and bordering Italy and Austria to the alpine west and north, Hungary to the north-east, and Croatia along a long frontier to the east and south. [e]
  • Developing Article South Korea [r]: A democratic republic in East Asia, occupying the southern half of the Korean peninsula; established in 1948 after Korea's liberation from Japanese colonial rule. [e]
  • Stub File Transfer Protocol [r]: A simple client-server protocol used to transfer files between two nodes on an Internet Protocol network [e]
  • Stub GNU [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Developing Article India [r]: Add brief definition or description