Sum 41

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Sum 41 is a Canadian pop punk band from Ajax, Ontario.[1] The current members are Deryck Whibley (lead vocals, guitar, keyboards), and Cone McCaslin (bass guitar, backing vocals). The band's "classic" line-up included Dave Baksh on lead guitar and backing vocals, and Steve Jocz on drums, percussion, and backing vocals.

In 1999, the band signed an international record deal with Island Records. Since then, the band has released four studio albums, all of which have been certified platinum in Canada.[2] Their most successful album to date is All Killer No Filler, which is certified 3x platinum in Canada and platinum in the United States.[3] The album was fueled by the single "Fat Lip", which reached the top position on the Billboard Modern Rock chart, making it the band's most successful single.[4] The second single off the album, "In Too Deep", reached number-ten on the Modern Rock chart.[5]

The band often performs more than 300 times in a single year and hold long global tours, most of which last more than a year.[6] They have been nominated for seven Juno Awards (the Canadian equivalent of a Grammy) and have won twice (Group Of The Year in 2002 and Rock Album of the Year for Chuck in 2005). They also have been nominated for three different Canadian Independent Music Awards: In 2004, they won a Woodie Award for "The Good Woodie (Greatest Social Impact)".[7] They have also been nominated for a Kerrang! Award in 2003 for "Best Live Act".[8]

History

Beginnings and Half Hour of Power (1996–2000)

Sum 41 was formed on July 31, 1996 or forty-one days into the summer, hence the name (Summer 41 Days). The band was originally a NOFX cover band named Kaspir; they changed their name to Sum 41 for a Supernova show on September 28, 1996.[9][10]

In 1998 the band recorded a demo tape on Compact Cassette which they sent to record companies in hope of getting a recording contract. These demo tapes are rare and are the only recordings known with the original bassist Richard "Twitch" Roy.[11]

From 1999 to 2000, the band recorded several of their antics. The Introduction to Destruction and later the Cross The T's and Gouge Your I's DVDs both contained the self-recorded footage, among which were robbing a Kelly's Pizza with water guns and performing a dance to "Makes No Difference" in front of a theater.

Sum 41 released the EP Half Hour of Power on June 27, 2000. The first single released by the band was "Makes No Difference", which had two different music videos. The first video was put together using the video clips sent to the record label and the second showed the band performing at a house party.[12]

All Killer No Filler and Does This Look Infected? (2001–2003)

Sum 41's first full-length album, All Killer No Filler, was released on May 8, 2001. "Fat Lip", the album's first single, achieved notable commercial success; it topped the U.S. Billboard modern rock chart as well as other charts around the world.[13] After "Fat Lip", the band released two more singles from the album: "In Too Deep" and "Motivation". "In Too Deep" had a comedic music video of the band in a diving competition against jocks; "Motivation" had a video of the band playing in a small room. The band spent much of 2001 touring; they played over 300 concerts that year (among which was a Blink-182 concert they opened) before returning to the studio to record another album. They took the last week of the tour off due to the September 11 terrorist attacks.[14] They later rescheduled the cancelled shows.[15]

On November 26, 2002, Sum 41 released their second full-length album, Does This Look Infected?.[16] The special edition came with a DVD, Cross The T's and Gouge Your I's. Whibley said of the album: "We don't want to make another record that sounds like the last record, I hate when bands repeat albums."[17] The first single released was "Still Waiting", which was followed by "The Hell Song". "The Hell Song"'s music video depicted the band using dolls with their pictures on them and others, such as Ozzy Osbourne and Pamela Anderson. Their next single, "Over My Head (Better Off Dead)", had a video released exclusively in Canada and on their website, featuring live shots of the band. The video also appeared on their live DVD, Sake Bombs And Happy Endings (2003), as a bonus feature.

References

  1. Juno Awards 2003. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  2. Aquarius Records: About, Aquarius Records. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  3. Edwards, Gavin. People of the Year 2001: Sum 41, Rolling Stone, December 17, 2001. Retrieved on 2008-08-19.
  4. Artists Chart History. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  5. Artists Chart History. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  6. Sum 41 Past Tour Dates, Island Records. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  7. MTVU Woodie Awards, Jambase.com. Retrieved on 2008-10-20.
  8. Kerrang! 2003 awards, BBC, 2003-08-06. Retrieved on 2008-10-20.
  9. Hartmann, Graham (18 April 2013). Sum 41 Drummer Steve Jocz Leaves Band. Loudwire. Retrieved on 20 April 2014.
  10. Artists- Sum 41, 100xr.com. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  11. Sum 41-B-sides and rarities list, Theresnosolution.com. Retrieved on 2008-10-16.
  12. Sum 41 Bio, Vh1.com, 2007. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  13. Billboard.com -Artist Chart History- Sum 41, Billboard.com. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  14. Davis, Darren. Sum 41 News on Yahoo! music, Yahoo! Music, September 20, 2001. Retrieved on 2008-08-17.
  15. Wiederhorn, Jon. Sum 41 Plan DVD, Live B-Sides, Monthlong Tour, MTV.com, 2002-02-21. Retrieved on 2008-10-20.
  16. D'Angelo, Joe. Sum 41 Ask, Does This Look Infected?, MTV.com, 2002-09-13. Retrieved on 2008-10-20.
  17. Edwards, Gavin (October 11, 2001). Canadian Teenage Rock and Roll Machine.. Rolling Stone, 50.