Faithful America

From Citizendium
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is developing and not approved.
Main Article
Discussion
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and subject to a disclaimer.

Faithful America is an interfaith social and political interest group, which states its chief goals as:[1]

  • ending poverty and promote economic security for all
  • promoting peace and restore America's commitment to human rights and diplomacy; they formed in response to the incidents at Abu Ghraib prison
  • preventing the catastrophic effects of climate change
  • counter hate speech and misinformation in the media pertaining to people of faith
  • working for welcoming communities where immigrants and people of all faiths are welcome

Within religion in the United States, they include but go beyond the Christian Left. Its core partners are:

History

It was formed June 15, 2004, first producing an advertisement on Arabic language satellite television expressing regret to Muslims for the abuse committed by Americans at Abu Ghraib prison.
A Salaam A'alaykum ["Peace be with you" in Arabic]. As Americans of faith, we express our deep sorrow at abuses committed in Iraqi prisons. We stand in solidarity with all those in Iraq and everywhere who demand justice and human dignity. We condemn the sinful and systemic abuses committed in our name, and pledge to work to right these wrongs.

Allies and Components

It received initial strategic guidance from Res Publica and True Majority, to develop its capability for faith-based online activism. Faithful America was previously hosted by the National Council of Churches in Christ (NCCC). In August 2007, Faith in Public Life became host of this vibrant online community.

Programs

One of its major efforts is malaria prevention. [2] When it started the program in 2007, the announcement called the new GiveANet program part of the social activism arm of the National Council of Churches.

References