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9K33M3 Osa-AKM

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Introduced in 1980, the 9K33M3 Osa-AKM (NATO reporting name SA-8 GECKO) surface-to-air missile system intended for short-range, low-altitude, all-weather air defense. It has been updated over time, and is used by a wide range of countries. [1] Typically, it is deployed in batteries of four, with two BAZ-5937 resupply/transloader vehicles, carrying 18 missiles each.

Tactically, it was intended to accompany moving mechanized divisions or other mobile formations, and be sufficiently self-contained that a single vehicle could stop quickly and engage immediate threats. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; invalid names, e.g. too many

It was a key part of Gulf War Iraqi tactical air defense.

Characteristics

It is carried on a six-wheeled transporter-erector-launcher-erector (TELAR), so is reasonably self-contained. Maximum range is approximately 15 kilometers/9.4 miles, against targets. Depending on the tactical situation, either one or two missiles may be launched at each target.[1]

Electronics

It has an H-band LAND ROLL fire control radar, with a maximum detection range of 30 to 35 kilometers. There is also a J-band tracking radar and a pair of I-band guidance radars. If two missiles are fired,they use different I-band guidance frequencies as a form of electronic protection. In addition, each missile guidance radar is coaxially mounted with a low-light television (i.e., electro-optical) guidance assist usable when heavy electronic countermeasures are directed against this system.

References