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Difference between revisions of "Prizzi's Family"

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==Condon's style==
 
==Condon's style==
While making love: "It was like being locked in a mailbag with eleven boa constrictors." page 68
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Condon attacked his targets, usually gangsters, financiers, and politicians, wholeheartedly but with a uniquely original style and wit that made almost any paragraph from one of his books instantly recognizable. Reviewing one of his works in the ''International Herald Tribune'', the well-known playwright [[George Axelrod]] (''[[The Seven-Year Itch]]'', ''[[Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter]]''), who had collaborated with Condon on the screenplay for the film adaptation of ''The Manchurian Candidate'', wrote:
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<blockquote>"The arrival of a new novel by Richard Condon is like an invitation to a party.... the sheer gusto of the prose, the madness of his similies, the lunacy of his metaphors, his infectious, almost child-like joy in composing complex sentences that go bang at the end in the manner of exploding cigars is both exhilarating and as exhausting as any good party ought to be."</blockquote>
  
"The way he did this was whisper into Vincent's ear in Sicilian, then Vincent spoke it into the microphone in Brooklynese, dumping the words out of the depths of his stomach the way a piled wheelbarrow is emptied by upending it." page 59
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In Prizzi's Honor, Condon's normal exuberance was somewhat curbed by choosing to the narrate the events through the viewpoints of its various semi-literate gangsters. In Family, however, he returns to being his usual [[Omniscient narrator|omniscient narrator]] and we have:
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The Don makes a speech to an enormous Family gathering: "The way he did this was whisper into Vincent's ear in Sicilian, then Vincent spoke it into the microphone in Brooklynese, dumping the words out of the depths of his stomach the way a piled wheelbarrow is emptied by upending it."
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Charley makes love for the first time with Maerose: "It was like being locked in a mailbag with eleven boa constrictors."
  
 
==Real-life names in the book==
 
==Real-life names in the book==

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Prizzi's Family is a satirical, semi-humorous crime novel by Richard Condon published in 1986. It is the second of four novels featuring the Prizzis, a powerful family of Mafiosi in New York City. In all four novels the main protagonist is a top member of the family named Charlie Partanna. It is a prequel to the very successful Prizzi's Honor of 1982, which was also adapted into an award-winning film.

Plot summary

Mardell La Tour is actually Grace Willand Crowell, daughter of an Assistant Sec. of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, an immensely wealthy family that lives in a Federalist House in Georgetown.

Vincent Prizzi, son of Don and Boss: Vincent conspired with his own ignorance. He was a perpetually baffled man who chewed on pieces of himself and then spat them out at the world.

Condon's style

Condon attacked his targets, usually gangsters, financiers, and politicians, wholeheartedly but with a uniquely original style and wit that made almost any paragraph from one of his books instantly recognizable. Reviewing one of his works in the International Herald Tribune, the well-known playwright George Axelrod (The Seven-Year Itch, Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter), who had collaborated with Condon on the screenplay for the film adaptation of The Manchurian Candidate, wrote:

"The arrival of a new novel by Richard Condon is like an invitation to a party.... the sheer gusto of the prose, the madness of his similies, the lunacy of his metaphors, his infectious, almost child-like joy in composing complex sentences that go bang at the end in the manner of exploding cigars is both exhilarating and as exhausting as any good party ought to be."

In Prizzi's Honor, Condon's normal exuberance was somewhat curbed by choosing to the narrate the events through the viewpoints of its various semi-literate gangsters. In Family, however, he returns to being his usual omniscient narrator and we have:

The Don makes a speech to an enormous Family gathering: "The way he did this was whisper into Vincent's ear in Sicilian, then Vincent spoke it into the microphone in Brooklynese, dumping the words out of the depths of his stomach the way a piled wheelbarrow is emptied by upending it."

Charley makes love for the first time with Maerose: "It was like being locked in a mailbag with eleven boa constrictors."

Real-life names in the book

All of Condon's books have, to an unknown degree, the names of real people in them as characters, generally very minor or peripheral. The most common, which appears in most of his books, is some variation of Franklin M. Heller. The real-life Heller was a television director in New York City in the 1950s, '60s, and 70s, who initially lived on Long Island and then moved to a house on Rockrimmon Road in Stamford, Connecticut.[1] In this book Franklin Heller is the mayor of New York.

A.H. Weiler, a film critic for The New York Times, was another friend of Condon's who in this book is Dr. Abraham Weiler, the best orthopedic surgeon in the Northwest.

Reception

Publisher's Weekly https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-399-13210-0

for Prizzi's Glory: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1988-10-24-8802100696-story.html

External links

Not a review, but an interview with Condon: https://www.nytimes.com/1986/10/29/books/condon-s-prizzis-turn-into-a-series.html?searchResultPosition=1

Review by Jimmy Breslin: https://www.nytimes.com/1986/09/28/books/charley-and-maerose-the-early-years.html?searchResultPosition=4

Sept. 28, 1986, Section 7, Page 13 of the National edition with the headline: CHARLEY AND MAEROSE: THE EARLY YEARS.
  1. Remembrance of Frank Heller, by Ira Skutch, at