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Islamic Society of North America

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Formed in 1983 by the Muslim Student Association (MSA),[1] the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA) provides services to the Muslim community of North America. It features an annual convention for the exchange of ideas, and works to build bridges of understanding and cooperation within the diversity that is Islam in America, ISNA is now playing a pivotal role in extending those bridges to include all people of faith within North America."[2] Its President is Sudanese-born Imam Mohamed Magid, executive director of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society in Sterling, who stepped up from vice-president to replace Ingrid Mattson.[3]

Muslim Students Association

There is a cooperative relationship between MSA and ISNA. The MSA National President has a seat on the ISNA governing council.

The MSA Annual Continental Conference is held alongside ISNA because it is cost-effective for students to attend with their families and for MSA National to benefit from ISNA's negotiations for hotel/conference rooms.

International

Beyond North America, it participates in "projects that are often more humanitarian than theological, more global than national, and altogether more complex and nuanced. These include efforts to stop the human tragedy in Darfur, for instance, or to alleviate the plight of those hit by the Tsunami in South East Asia, or to work with state and civic structures in addressing the challenges that Muslims in the West face."

Extremism

DiscoverTheNetworks states its major mission is to enforce "extremist Wahhabi theological writ in America's mosques", and was founded by MSA and an American active in Palestinian Islamic Jihad, Sami Al-Arian.[4]

It was an unindicted co-conspirator, as a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, in U.S. v. Holy Land Foundation.[5]

ISNA is an original signatory to the Amman Message [6] "which recognizes the validity of Islam’s different theological and legal schools, including Sunnism, Shiism and Sufism.”

Soup

In Canada, Campbell'a Soup has offered a line of halal packaged foods, which they do not plan to offer in the U.S. On her blog, Atlas Shrugged, blogger Pamela Geller has protested the move, saying that ISNA, not halal, is the problem: "No one is suggesting they refrain from this line. No one is suggesting they not have halal food. I'm not against halal food any more than I'm against kosher food. My issue is who's doing the certifying." Geller, who is an active critic of the proposed mosque in lower Manhattan. alleges that ISNA has ties to the Muslim Brotherhood, which is not listed as a terrorist organization by the U.S. Department of State.

The matter, however, has spread to a Facebook page, "Boycott Campbell Soup for their certification of their products as halal and supporting the Muslim Brotherhood." [7]

References