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Difference between revisions of "Ideal gas law/Bibliography"

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==Books==
 
* "General Chemistry, 2nd Ed.", pp 103-117, D. D. Ebbing & M. S. Wrighton, Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 1987.  
 
* "General Chemistry, 2nd Ed.", pp 103-117, D. D. Ebbing & M. S. Wrighton, Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 1987.  
 
* "General Chemistry with Qualitative Analysis, 2nd Ed.", pp. 263-278, Saunders College Publishing, Philadelphia, 1984.
 
* "General Chemistry with Qualitative Analysis, 2nd Ed.", pp. 263-278, Saunders College Publishing, Philadelphia, 1984.
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==Journal articles==
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*{{CZ:Ref:Talbot 1972 Antecedents of Thermodynamics in the Work of Guillaume Amontons}}

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A list of key readings about Ideal gas law.
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Books

  • "General Chemistry, 2nd Ed.", pp 103-117, D. D. Ebbing & M. S. Wrighton, Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 1987.
  • "General Chemistry with Qualitative Analysis, 2nd Ed.", pp. 263-278, Saunders College Publishing, Philadelphia, 1984.

Journal articles

Puts the work of Guillaume Amontons in the context of chemical and physical investigations during the late 17th and early 18th century. Highlights his contributions to what we now call thermodynamics and emphasizes that he came to his theoretical conclusions while working on very practical problems (e.g. accurately measuring weather conditions on board of a marine vessel).