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British English/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about British English.
See also changes related to British English, or pages that link to British English or to this page or whose text contains "British English".

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Auto-populated based on Special:WhatLinksHere/British English. Needs checking by a human.

  • American English [r]: Any of the spoken and written variants of the English language originating in the United States of America; widely used around the world. [e]
  • Bread machine [r]: Home appliance to aid in making of bread. [e]
  • British Empire [r]: The worldwide domain controlled by Britain from its origins about 1600 [e]
  • British and American English [r]: A comparison between these two language variants in terms of vocabulary, spelling and pronunciation. [e]
  • Canadian English [r]: Any of the dialects of English, standard or not, that are used in Canada. [e]
  • Commonwealth English [r]: A blanket term for the English that developed during the British Empire separately from the United States of America. [e]
  • Concentration [r]: In science, engineering and in general common usage: the measure of how much of a given substance there is in a given mixture of substances. [e]
  • Crisps [r]: Extremely thin slice of potato, generally deep-fried and eaten cold as a snack. [e]
  • Deutsche Mark [r]: Official currency of West Germany and, from 1990 until the adoption of the euro, all of unified Germany. [e]
  • Dialect [r]: Regional or social variety of a language distinguished by pronunciation, grammar, or vocabulary, especially a variety of speech differing from the standard literary language or speech pattern of the culture in which it exists. [e]
  • Dictionary [r]: Reference work containing words classed alphabetically and giving information about spelling, etymology and usage. [e]
  • E (letter) [r]: The fifth letter of the English and Latin alphabets. [e]
  • Elizabeth II [r]: The present monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom since 1952 (born 1926). [e]
  • English language [r]: A West Germanic language widely spoken in the United Kingdom, its territories and dependencies, Commonwealth countries and former colonial outposts of the British Empire; has developed the status of a global language. [e]
  • English phonemes [r]: A list of abstract sound units and their various spellings. [e]
  • English spellings [r]: Lists of English words showing pronunciation, and articles about letters. [e]
  • French words in English [r]: French words and phrases in English, including a catalog. [e]
  • International Phonetic Alphabet [r]: System of phonetic notation based on the Latin alphabet, devised by the International Phonetic Association as a standardized representation of the sounds of spoken language. [e]
  • Japanese English [r]: English as used by native speakers of Japanese, either for communicating with non-Japanese speakers or commercial and entertainment purposes. Includes vocabulary and usages not found in the native English-speaking world. [e]
  • Linguistics [r]: The scientific study of language. [e]
  • Mathematics [r]: The study of quantities, structures, their relations, and changes thereof. [e]
  • O (letter) [r]: The fifteenth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet. [e]
  • Parts-per notation [r]: Notation used in science and engineering, to denote dimensionless proportionalities in measured quantities such as proportions at the parts-per-million (ppm), parts-per-billion (ppb), and parts-per-trillion (ppt) level. [e]
  • Phonetics [r]: Study of speech sounds and their perception, production, combination, and description. [e]
  • Public [r]: Shared by, open or available to everyone, well or generally known, universally available or without limit, done or made on behalf of the community as a whole, open to general or unlimited viewing or disclosure, frequented by large numbers of people or for general use, or places generally open or visible to all pertaining to official matters or maintained at taxpayer expense. [e]
  • Q (letter) [r]: The seventeenth letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • R (letter) [r]: The 18th letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Railroad [r]: Technology that allows vehicles to travel on networks of fixed rails. [e]
  • Received Pronunciation [r]: British English accent that developed in educational institutions in the nineteenth century and is associated with the wealthy and powerful in the United Kingdom, rather than a geographic region, and which few British people actually use; 'refined' RP, even rarer, is colloquially referred to as 'posh'. [e]
  • Regional dialect levelling [r]: The process whereby the local dialects of a region become less distinctive as a result of mixing with each other. [e]
  • Salt and health [r]: Article describing health effects of salt (sodium chloride) in the diet, giving governments' recommendations for consumption. [e]
  • Silent letters in English [r]: English letter or letters within a particular word, which are not heard in the pronunciation of the word, but appear in the spelling—and the opposite. [e]
  • Singapore English [r]: Varieties of English spoken in Singapore, including Singapore Standard English (SSE) and Singapore Colloquial English (SCE, or 'Singlish'). [e]
  • Thalassemia [r]: A group of hereditary hemolytic anemias in which there is decreased synthesis of one or more hemoglobin polypeptide chains (National Library of Medicine). [e]
  • Trigonometric function [r]: Function of an angle expressed as the ratio of two of the sides of a right triangle that contains that angle; the sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, secant, and cosecant. [e]
  • U (letter) [r]: The twenty-first letter of the English alphabet. [e]
  • Vowel [r]: Speech sound with relatively unhindered airflow; different vowels are articulated mainly through tongue movements at the palatal and velar regions of the mouth, and are usually voiced (i.e. involve vocal fold movement). [e]
  • Wrench (tool) [r]: A fastening tool used to tighten or loosen threaded fasteners, with one end that makes firm contact with flat surfaces of the fastener, and the other end providing a means of applying force [e]
  • Z (letter) [r]: The twenty-sixth and last letter of the English alphabet. [e]