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'''Asaṅga''' (無着, also called Aryasanga; born c. 300 [[Common Era|C.E.]]) was an [[India]]n exponent of [[Yogācāra]] [[Buddhism]] and is considered, along with his brother [[Vasubandhu]], to have been the founder of this religious school.   
 
'''Asaṅga''' (無着, also called Aryasanga; born c. 300 [[Common Era|C.E.]]) was an [[India]]n exponent of [[Yogācāra]] [[Buddhism]] and is considered, along with his brother [[Vasubandhu]], to have been the founder of this religious school.   
  
 
Asanga was born during the fourth century in [[Gandhāra]] in north India, as a [[Brahmin]]'s son. He was perhaps originally a member of the [[Mahīśāsaka]], or the [[Sarvastivada|Mūlasarvāstivāda]] school.  But after many years of intense meditation, he converted to [[Mahāyāna]].  some traditions say that, during this meditative period, he often visited Tushita Heaven to receive teachings from [[Maitreya-nātha]].  <ref>Wayman</ref> Asanga wrote many of the key Yogācāra treatises, including the [[Yogācārabhūmi-śāstra]], the [[Mahāyāna-samgraha]] and the [[Abhidharma-samuccaya]], although there are discrepancies between Chinese and Tibetan traditions as to which works should be attributed to him and which to Maitreya-nātha.<ref>Tucci</ref>
 
Asanga was born during the fourth century in [[Gandhāra]] in north India, as a [[Brahmin]]'s son. He was perhaps originally a member of the [[Mahīśāsaka]], or the [[Sarvastivada|Mūlasarvāstivāda]] school.  But after many years of intense meditation, he converted to [[Mahāyāna]].  some traditions say that, during this meditative period, he often visited Tushita Heaven to receive teachings from [[Maitreya-nātha]].  <ref>Wayman</ref> Asanga wrote many of the key Yogācāra treatises, including the [[Yogācārabhūmi-śāstra]], the [[Mahāyāna-samgraha]] and the [[Abhidharma-samuccaya]], although there are discrepancies between Chinese and Tibetan traditions as to which works should be attributed to him and which to Maitreya-nātha.<ref>Tucci</ref>
 
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
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==Bibliography==
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*Giuseppe Tucci ''On Some Aspects of the Doctrines of Maitreya (natha) and the Asanga''. Calcutta, 1930
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*Alex Wayman "Doctrinal Affiliation of the Buddhist Master Asanga", in his ''Untying the Knots in Buddhism: Selected Essays''. Buddhist Tradition Series, volume 28.  Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, 1997. ISBN 81-208-1321-9
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Asaṅga (無着, also called Aryasanga; born c. 300 C.E.) was an Indian exponent of Yogācāra Buddhism and is considered, along with his brother Vasubandhu, to have been the founder of this religious school.

Asanga was born during the fourth century in Gandhāra in north India, as a Brahmin's son. He was perhaps originally a member of the Mahīśāsaka, or the Mūlasarvāstivāda school. But after many years of intense meditation, he converted to Mahāyāna. some traditions say that, during this meditative period, he often visited Tushita Heaven to receive teachings from Maitreya-nātha. [1] Asanga wrote many of the key Yogācāra treatises, including the Yogācārabhūmi-śāstra, the Mahāyāna-samgraha and the Abhidharma-samuccaya, although there are discrepancies between Chinese and Tibetan traditions as to which works should be attributed to him and which to Maitreya-nātha.[2]

References

  1. Wayman
  2. Tucci