User:George Swan/sandbox/Army Regulation 190-8 (tribunal)/Related Articles

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  • Military police [r]: A branch of military service, or units of that branch, which both do routine enforcement of military law within armed forces, but also provide classic police services related to the special relations of a military force to other civilian and opposing military groups: apprehension and the handling of surrendered groups, physical security, detention facilities, etc. Other branches are often responsible for intelligence, trials and interpretation of military law, and criminal investigation [e]
  • Judge Advocate General [r]: U.S. military legal officer [e]
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