Talk:Acoustic energy

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 Definition Energy propagated as pressure waves, through elastic media such as air or water. Hearing is the detection of acoustic energy within the frequency range of the animal detecting the energy [d] [e]

Cetaceans, sonar, etc.

The purpose of mentioning cetaceans in this article is merely to define some biological responses to acoustic energy. It referred to a specific article on sonar, which further defined the technology.

The specific concerns about cetaceans are discussed with respect to a specific acoustic system in Geophysical MASINT#Surveillance Vessel Low-Frequency Active. This, however, did not specifically address beaching, although that's certainly relevant in one of these articles, especially with additional sourcing. I'll go back and reference that section in this article, but I would have to say I find that far too specific for this article.

I made the judgment call, rightly or wrongly, that bats' use of sonar affected their ears' anatomy: the external pinna has to be small to resolve the short ultrasonic wavelength. In like manner, I did not go into detail on feline, canine, or human sound generation and perception (other than that I had a cat sitting and glaring at me for presuming that a cat could be called, if it did not intend to be called, by a mere "dog" whistle).

Cetacean beachings/behavior may eventually warrant its own article; beachings certainly aren't only due to sonar alone. There is also a place in the SURTASS-LFA discussion where sourced statements reasonably could go.

I'd just ask this article to stay focused on the energy itself, with examples given to add perspective. Howard C. Berkowitz 16:45, 28 September 2008 (CDT)