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Renaissance/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Renaissance.
See also changes related to Renaissance, or pages that link to Renaissance or to this page or whose text contains "Renaissance".

Parent topics

  • World history [r]: The study and teaching of connections within the global community. [e]

Subtopics

Other related topics

Bot-suggested topics

Auto-populated based on Special:WhatLinksHere/Renaissance. Needs checking by a human.

  • Anthropology [r]: The holistic study of humankind; from the Greek words anthropos ("human") and logia ("study"). [e]
  • Astronomy [r]: The study of objects and processes in the observable universe, e.g. stars, planets, comets or asteroids. [e]
  • Atheism [r]: Absence of belief in any god or other supernatural beings; distinct from antitheism, or opposition to religion, and agnosticism, the position that one cannot know whether such beings exist. [e]
  • Boudica [r]: Queen of the British Iceni who led a revolt against the Roman occupation in AD 60 or 61. [e]
  • Chanticleer (choir) [r]: American a cappella vocal group specializing in Renaissance music. [e]
  • Chess [r]: Board game for two players played on a checkered board requiring skill, strategy and intellect. [e]
  • Crusades [r]: Medieval wars of religion fought by Christians, the most famous being in the Holy Land. [e]
  • Elizabeth I [r]: Queen of England (reigned 1559-1603). [e]
  • England [r]: The largest and southernmost country in the United Kingdom, and location of the largest city and seat of government, London; population about 51,000,000. [e]
  • Galen [r]: (ca. 131 - ca. 201) Pergamum-born influential physician of antiquity, who produced a philosophically sophisticated synthesis of earlier medical theories of the body that was dominant until the seventeenth century. [e]
  • Geoffrey of Monmouth [r]: Welsh medieval author of the largely legendary History of the Kings of Britain. [e]
  • Gerontology [r]: Biomedical, sociological and psychological study of aging. [e]
  • History [r]: Study of past human events based on evidence such as written documents. [e]
  • Latin language [r]: An Indo-European language of the Italic group which was the dominant medium of communication in western Europe for many centuries; the ancestor of today's Romance languages, such as French and Spanish. [e]
  • Literature [r]: The profession of “letters” (from Latin litteras), and written texts considered as aesthetic and expressive objects. [e]
  • Martin Luther [r]: German theologian and monk (1483-1546); led the Reformation; believed that salvation is granted on the basis of faith rather than deeds. [e]
  • Mathematics [r]: The study of quantities, structures, their relations, and changes thereof. [e]
  • Middle Ages [r]: Period in European history, lasting from the fall of the Roman Empire in 476 AD to the fall of Constantinople (1453) or the beginning of the Renaissance around 1500 AD. [e]
  • Paracelsus [r]: (1493-1541) An early Renaissance alchemist, philosopher and physician credited with founding the modern fields of pharmacology and toxicology. [e]
  • Piazza Telematica [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Ptolemy [r]: (2nd century AD) Egyptian astronomer and geographer whose main work, the Almagest, a compendium of contemporary astronomical knowledge, was in use into the 15th century. [e]
  • Sephardi Jews [r]: Add brief definition or description
  • Simple machine [r]: Six mechanical concepts, known from antiquity, which form the basis of many modern tools and machines [e]
  • Socrates [r]: (ca. 470–399 BCE) Greek philosopher who is credited with laying the foundations of western philosophy; sentenced to death in Athens for heresy. [e]
  • Soranus of Ephesus [r]: (1st - 2nd century) Greek physician from Ephesus, who was one of the chief representatives of the Methodic school of medicine. [e]
  • Strasbourg [r]: Capital of Alsace in France. [e]
  • Vesalius [r]: (1514 - 1564) Flemish physician who revolutionized the field of anatomy by laying the groundwork for a new, observation-based methodology, using dissections of human cadavers. [e]
  • Welding [r]: Fabrication process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence at a high melting point. [e]