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Reformation/Related Articles

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A list of Citizendium articles, and planned articles, about Reformation.
See also changes related to Reformation, or pages that link to Reformation or to this page or whose text contains "Reformation".

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  • Augustine of Hippo [r]: (November 13 354–August 28 430) Bishop and Doctor of the Church. [e]
  • Boston, Lincolnshire [r]: Port in Lincolnshire on the East coast of England. [e]
  • Christianity [r]: The largest world religion, which centers around the worship of one God, his son Jesus Christ, and his Holy Spirit. [e]
  • Deism [r]: A religious philosophy which holds that religious beliefs must be founded on human reason and observed features of the natural world, and that these sources reveal the existence of a God or supreme being. [e]
  • Eastern Orthodox Church [r]: Those Christians who are in communion with the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople. [e]
  • Edinburgh [r]: The capital of Scotland. [e]
  • England [r]: The largest and southernmost country in the United Kingdom, and location of the largest city and seat of government, London; population about 51,000,000. [e]
  • History of pre-classical economic thought [r]: The period of economic thought and theory that runs from early antiquity until past the Physiocrats and ends before Adam Smith. [e]
  • History of scientific method [r]: Development and elaboration of rules for scientific reasoning and investigation. [e]
  • History [r]: Study of past human events based on evidence such as written documents. [e]
  • Johannes Gutenberg [r]: German goldsmith and inventor of movable type printing. [e]
  • Lead [r]: Chemical element number 82, a corrosion-resistant, dense, ductile heavy metal known to cause neurological problems. [e]
  • Lutheranism [r]: Protestant branch of Christianity, created in the Reformation of the 16th century out of the teachings of German theologian Martin Luther. [e]
  • Magdeburg [r]: 1200-year old capital of Saxony-Anhalt (Germany). [e]
  • Martin Luther [r]: German theologian and monk (1483-1546); led the Reformation; believed that salvation is granted on the basis of faith rather than deeds. [e]
  • Netherlands [r]: Constitutional monarchy (population c. 16.6 million; capital Amsterdam) located at the delta of three major rivers (Rhine, Maas or Meuse, and Schelde) in north-western Europe; situated between Germany and Belgium, and bordering the North Sea to the north and west; founding member of the European Union. [e]
  • Oliver Cromwell [r]: (1599-1658) English soldier, statesman, and leader of the Puritan revolution, nicknamed "Old Ironsides". [e]
  • Papacy [r]: Head of the Roman Catholic Church. [e]
  • Presbyterian [r]: A term in religion to describe church governance. It has a graded system of representative ecclesiastical bodies, such as presbyteries, sessions and a general assembly, that have legislative and judicial powers. [e]
  • Protestantism [r]: The branch of Christianity that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation of the 16th century. [e]
  • Reformed theology [r]: An approach to doctrine and church government based on Calvinism as expressed in Reformed confessions. [e]
  • Scotland [r]: A country that forms the northernmost part of the United Kingdom; population about 5,200,000. [e]