Reactive arthritis

From Citizendium, the Citizens' Compendium
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is developing and not approved.
Main Article
Talk
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and not meant to be cited; by editing it you can help to improve it towards a future approved, citable version. These unapproved articles are subject to a disclaimer.

In medicine, reactive arthritis is an "aseptic, inflammatory arthritis developing secondary to a primary extra-articular infection, most typically of the gastrointestinal tract or urogenital system. The initiating trigger pathogens are usually shigella; salmonella; yersinia; campylobacter; or chlamydia trachomatis. Reactive arthritis is strongly associated with HLA-B27 antigen."[1] In simpler terms, it is an inflammation of a joint that develops after an infectiou outside a joint.

While the arthritic inflammation must be treated, a careful search must be made for remaining infection, and, if any is found, treated.

Epidemiology

The frequency of reactive arthritis after an infection is estimated to be 0.6 to 3.1 cases/100,000.[2]

References

  1. Anonymous (2015), Reactive arthritis (English). Medical Subject Headings. U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  2. Townes JM, Deodhar AA, Laine ES, et al (December 2008). "Reactive arthritis following culture-confirmed infections with bacterial enteric pathogens in Minnesota and Oregon: a population-based study". Ann. Rheum. Dis. 67 (12): 1689–96. DOI:10.1136/ard.2007.083451. PMID 18272671. Research Blogging.