Nidal Hasan

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Nidal Malik Hasan (1970-) is a major, U.S. Army Medical Corps, a psychiatrist [1] under indictment for 16 murders and 32 attempted murders on 9 November 2009 at Fort Hood, Texas. Military prosecutors have said they intend to seek the death penalty, believing he acted alone as a self-radicalized terrorist rather than as part of a group effort.[2] In February 2009, the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs issued a report, "A Ticking Time Bomb", describing failures of the U.S. Department of Defense and Federal Bureau of Investigation to prevent the attack.

He was born a Muslim in the United States to citizen parents of Palestinian origin, and was described as quiet but increasingly religious, and, after his mother's death, moving toward fundamentalism. Hasan was in email contact with an American-born cleric in Yemen, Anwar al-Aulaqi, who is associated with al-Qaeda.

Education

  • B.S. Virginia Tech (1995) receiving a bachelor's degree in biochemistry with honors and minors in biology and chemistry. Had previously studied at Barstow Community College in California and Virginia Western Community College in Roanoke, where he earned an associate degree in science in 1992.
  • M.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 2003
  • 2003-2009,intern, a resident and fellow at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

References

  1. "Maj. Nidal M. Hasan", Washington Post, 7 November 2009
  2. Yochi Dreazen, Peter Speigel and Even Perez (13 November 2009), "Hasan to Face Death Penalty: Military Court to Try Major in Fort Hood Massacre; Inquiry Into Missed Warning Signs", Wall Street Journal