Klondike Gold Rush

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(PD) Photo: NPS archive
Routes to the Klondike gold fields.
(PD) Photo: NPS archive
Prospectors supplies stored at the height of the Chilkoot Pass.

The Klondike Gold Rush was a large scale migration of fortune-finders, traveling to the Klondike River, a tributary of the Yukon River, in the Canadian Yukon Territory.

The gold rush started in 1898. 100,000 fortune-finders are estimated to have set out for the gold fields, but only 30,000 are reported to have completed the journey.

The region remains isolated today, and was extremely isolated in 1898. The Canadian government enforced a regulation that prospectors needed to take a year's worth of supplies with them -- one ton of supplies.[1]

Most prospectors did not "strike it big".

References

  1. The Story of the Klondike Gold Rush: Part Seven, National Park Service. Retrieved on 2008-08-25.