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Neuroglia

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Neuroglia, also called glia and glial cells, can be considered the connective, non-neuron cells of the central nervous system. "They not only provide physical support, but also respond to injury, regulate the ionic and chemical composition of the extracellular milieu, participate in the blood-brain barrier and blood-retinal barrier, form the myelin insulation of nervous pathways, guide neuronal migration during development, and exchange metabolites with neurons. Neuroglia have high-affinity transmitter uptake systems, voltage-dependent and transmitter-gated ion channels, and can release transmitters, but their role in signaling (as in many other functions) is unclear."[1]

Gliomas are a class of benign and malignant tumors that develop from glial cells.

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