Foreign Policy (magazine)

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Foreign Policy is a commercial magazine with extensive Web and blog presence, which carries a variety of expert opinions, from different viewpoints, on international relations. It was founded, in 1970, by Samuel Huntington and Warren Demian Manshel, and is now by the Slate Group, a division of Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive, LLC, in Washington, D.C., "Our mission is to explain how the world works—in particular, how the process of globalization is reshaping nations, institutions, cultures, and, more fundamentally, our daily lives." The 2007 National Magazine Awards described it as “Always authoritative but never heavy-handed, Foreign Policy delivers on its mission to take readers beyond the facts to understand how the world works”[1]

Its Editor is Moisés Naím, who writes on the political economy of international trade and investment, multilateral organizations, economic reforms, and globalization. Dr. Naím served as Venezuela’s minister of trade and industry and played a central role in the initial launching of major economic reforms in the early 1990s. Prior to his ministerial position, he was professor and dean at Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administración, in Caracas. He was also the director of the projects on economic reforms and on Latin America at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Dr. Naím was associated with the World Bank on two occasions, first as an executive director and later as a senior advisor to the president. Dr. Naím holds a Ph.D. and a master’s degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[2]

Blogger/contributors

  • Thomas Ricks on military matters at "The Best Defense"
  • Harvard's Stephen Walt, coauthor of bestselling The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy, injects a dose of realism into the online political debate
  • Superclass author David Rothkopf gives readers an inside look at the global powerbrokers who really run the world
  • The Fletcher School's Daniel Drezner blogs on foreign policy, international economics (and occasionally the Red Sox)
  • George Washington University's Marc Lynch ("Abu Aardvark") blogs on the politics of the Middle East
  • Investigative journalist Laura Rozen writes The Cable, featuring original coverage, scoops, and behind-the-scenes reporting about the making of Washington’s foreign policy in the age of Obama
  • Madam Secretary: follows Hillary Clinton
  • Conservative writers include including Peter Feaver, Philip Zelikow, and FP’s newest editor -- and Condoleezza Rice's longtime speechwriter -- Christian Brose, critique the Obama presidency at Shadow Government: Notes from the loyal opposition.
  • The Call features political forecasting by Ian Bremmer and the political-risk consulting firm Eurasia Group

References

  1. About FP, Foreign Policy (magazine)
  2. Meet the Staff, Foreign Policy (magazine)