Coventry

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Coventry is a city and unitary authority in Warwickshire, United Kingdom. The city is perhaps most famous for its two cathedrals, one which was bombed to ruins in World War II and its modern replacement. It is also home to a motor car museum and a canal branch and basin. Coventry's inner ring road is of considerable interest to road enthusiasts as it fully complete, dual carriageway and grade separated, something which is next to unique in the UK.

The city is served by the Birmingham arm of the West Coast Main Line railway, with intercity services provided by Virgin Trains and local services by London Midland. The station is of a notably modernist design, being built in the mid-1960s. Coventry is also the starting point for railway branches to Leamington Spa and Nuneaton, the latter of which was closed in the 1960s but reopened in 1987.

The M6 motorway passes closely to the north of the city. Junctions 3 and 2 on the motorway give direct access to the centre and eastern side of the city respectively. The A45 road also passes through on its way from Northampton to the West Midlands. The M45 motorway terminates on the A45 a few miles east of Coventry, at the large town of Rugby. Additionally, the A46 passes the city, connecting the M69 motorway to Warwick.

Coventry is located in the West Midlands region of England. It is relatively close to Birmingham and as such suffers from competition with the larger city. However, disregarding Birmingham and the rest of the West Midlands conurbation, Coventry is the largest city between Leicester and London, with a population exceeding 300,000.