Bagram Airport

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The Bagram Airport (variously Bagram Air Base, Bagram Airfield) is a large airport 47 km (27 miles) north of Kabul, Afghanistan's capital, in theShomali Plain. It is in the Parwan Province approximately 11 kilometers (7 miles) southeast of the provincial capital of Charikar. It has a 10,000 foot runway built in 1976 capable of landing large cargo and bomber aircraft.[1] It is now a major base for the International Security Assistance Force. The U.S. 455th Air Expeditionary Wing is the resident based operations force, and a Provincial Reconstruction Team operates from Bagram in support of civilian infrastructure.

Bagram Airbase has three large hangars, a control tower, and numerous support buildings. There are over 32 acres of ramp space. There are five aircraft dispersal areas with a total of over 110 revettments.

Soviet period

During the Afghanistan War (1978-92) the Soviet Union built extensive military facilities at the airfield. Many support buildings and base housing built by the Soviets, have been destroyed by years of fighting between the various warring Afghan factions. [2]

2001-2002

It was captured early in the Afghanistan War (2001-) by British Special Boat Service troops. It became a major coalition facility, and the U.S. built the Bagram Theater Internment Facility in one of the Soviet era hangars.[2]

By early December 2001, it was shared by the U.S. 10th Mountain Division and 82nd Airborne Division, as well as personnel from Joint Special Operations Command. While it was planned as a coalition base, U.S. combat missions delayed the first contingents. Polish and Italian engineers, however, were involved in reconstruction by late June 2002. [3]

References

  1. "Afghanistan - Bagram Airbase", Globalsecurity
  2. 2.0 2.1 Eric Schmitt, Tim Golden. U.S. Planning Big New Prison in Afghanistan, New York Times, Saturday, May 17, 2008. Retrieved on 2008-05-17.
  3. "Afghanistan - Bagram Airbase 2001-2002", Globalsecurity