1925 Geneva Protocol

From Citizendium, the Citizens' Compendium
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is developing and not approved.
Main Article
Talk
Related Articles  [?]
Bibliography  [?]
External Links  [?]
Citable Version  [?]
 
This editable Main Article is under development and not meant to be cited; by editing it you can help to improve it towards a future approved, citable version. These unapproved articles are subject to a disclaimer.

Adopted in Geneva in 1925, the Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous or other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare was signed in Geneva on 17 June 1925 and it entered into force on 8 February 1928.[1] As of 1 January 2008, 135 countries had ratified it.[2]

This protocol refers to the use of chemical and biological weapons. Separate treaties deal with production and proliferation: the Chemical Weapons Convention and the Biological Weapons and Toxins Convention.

Arguably, its ancestry can be traced to the prohibition, in the Regulations Respecting the Laws and Customs of War on Land annexed to both the 1899 Hague Convention (II) with Respect to the Laws and Customs of War on Land and the 1907 Hague Convention (IV) Respecting the Laws and Customs of War on Land later codified this on polluting wells or poisoning bullets.

References